trite

Lethargic vs Trite - What's the difference?

lethargic | trite |


As adjectives the difference between lethargic and trite

is that lethargic is sluggish, slow while trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

As a noun trite is

a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

Trite vs Overplayed - What's the difference?

trite | overplayed |


As an adjective trite

is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

As a noun trite

is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

As a verb overplayed is

(overplay).

Trite vs Insincere - What's the difference?

trite | insincere |


As adjectives the difference between trite and insincere

is that trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase) while insincere is not genuinely meaning what has been expressed; not sincere; artificial.

As a noun trite

is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

Tortuous vs Trite - What's the difference?

tortuous | trite |


As adjectives the difference between tortuous and trite

is that tortuous is twisted; having many turns; convoluted while trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

As a noun trite is

a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

Trite vs Fine - What's the difference?

trite | fine |


As an adjective trite

is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

As a noun trite

is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

As a verb fine is

.

Trite vs Venal - What's the difference?

trite | venal |


As adjectives the difference between trite and venal

is that trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase) while venal is available for a price; venal.

As a noun trite

is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

Trite vs Ordinary - What's the difference?

trite | ordinary | Related terms |

Trite is a related term of ordinary.


As nouns the difference between trite and ordinary

is that trite is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater while ordinary is the part of the roman catholic mass that is the same every day.

As an adjective trite

is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

Public vs Trite - What's the difference?

public | trite | Related terms |

Public is a related term of trite.


As adjectives the difference between public and trite

is that public is public while trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

As a noun trite is

a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

Trite vs Miserable - What's the difference?

trite | miserable |


As adjectives the difference between trite and miserable

is that trite is worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase) while miserable is destitute, impoverished.

As nouns the difference between trite and miserable

is that trite is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater while miserable is wretch, scoundrel.

Trope vs Trite - What's the difference?

trope | trite |


As nouns the difference between trope and trite

is that trope is (literature) something recurring across a genre or type of literature, such as the ‘mad scientist’ of horror movies or ‘once upon a time’ as an introduction to fairy tales similar to archetype and but not necessarily pejorative while trite is a denomination of coinage in ancient greece equivalent to one third of a stater.

As a verb trope

is to use, or embellish something with a trope.

As an adjective trite is

worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase).

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