Patch vs Zone - What's the difference?

patch | zone | Synonyms |

Patch is a synonym of zone.


As a proper noun patch

is .

As a noun zone is

zone.

patch

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) patche, . Alternatively, perhaps a variant of (etyl) .

Noun

(es)
  • A piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, especially upon an old garment to cover a hole.
  • His sleeves had patches on the elbows where different fabric had been sewn on to replace material that had worn away.
  • A small piece of anything used to repair damage or a breach; as, a patch on a kettle, a roof, etc.
  • I can't afford to replace the roof, which is what it really needs. I'll have the roofer apply a patch .
  • A repair intended to be used for a limited time; (differs from previous usage in that it is intended to be a temporary fix and the size of the repair is irrelevant).
    This usage can mean that the repair is temporary because it is an early but necessary step in the process of properly, completely repairing something,
  • Before you can fix a dam, you have to apply a patch to the hole so that everything can dry off.
    or that it is temporary because it is not meant to last long or will be removed as soon as a proper repair can be made, which will happen in the near future.
    "This patch should hold until you reach the city," the mechanic said as he patted the car's hood.
  • A small, usually contrasting but always somehow different or distinct, part of something else (location, time, size);
  • The world economy had a rough patch in the 1930s.
    The storms last summer washed away parts of the road so we can expect some rough patches up ahead.
    To me, a normal cow is white with black patches , but Sarah's from Texas and most of the cows there have solid brown, black, or red coats.
    Doesn't that patch of clouds looks like a bunny?
    I lost my locket in this patch of grass here.
    When ice skating, be sure to stay away from reeds, there's always thin patches of ice there and you could fall through.
    I never get first place because on track eight, right after you pass the windmill, there's a patch of oil in the road that always gets me.
  • A small piece of black silk stuck on the face or neck to heighten beauty; an imitation beauty mark.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • Your black patches you wear variously.
  • (medicine) A piece of material used to cover a wound.
  • (medicine) An adhesive piece of material, impregnated with a drug, which is worn on the skin; the drug being slowly absorbed over a period of time.
  • Many people use a nicotine patch to wean themselves off of nicotine.
  • (medicine) A cover worn over a damaged eye, an eyepatch.
  • He had scratched his cornea so badly that his doctor told him to wear a patch .
  • A block on the muzzle of a gun, to do away with the effect of dispart, in sighting.
  • (computing) A patch file, a file used for input to a patch program or that describes changes made to a computer file or files, usually changes made to a computer program that fix a programming bug.
  • A small piece of material that is manually passed through a gun barrel to clean it.
  • A piece of greased cloth or leather used as wrapping for a rifle ball, to make it fit the bore.
  • A cable connecting two pieces of electrical equipment.
  • A sound setting for a musical synthesizer (originally selected by means of a patch cable).
  • Synonyms
    * (piece of black silk) beauty spot * section, area, blotch, spot, period of time, spell, stretch * diff file
    Derived terms
    * cabbage patch * not a patch on * patch file * patch up * patchwork * patchy

    Verb

    (es)
  • To mend by sewing on a piece or pieces of cloth, leather, or the like; as, to patch a coat.
  • *, chapter=8
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=That concertina was a wonder in its way. The handles that was on it first was wore out long ago, and he'd made new ones of braided rope yarn. And the bellows was patched in more places than a cranberry picker's overalls.}}
  • To mend with pieces; to repair by fastening pieces on.
  • To make out of pieces or patches, like a quilt.
  • To join or unite the pieces of; to patch the skirt.
  • A temporary, removable electronic connection, as one between two components in a communications system.
  • * (rfdate) The Matrix Revolutions , Scene: Starting the Logos, 00:43:09 - 00:43:32
  • [the control panel of hovercraft'' The Logos ''has lit up after being jumped by'' The Hammer]
    Sparky: ''She lives again.''
    Crew member of The Hammer via radio: ''You want us to patch an uplink to reload the software, Sparky?''
    Sparky: ''Yeah, that'd be swell. And can you clean the windshield while you're at it?
  • To repair or arrange in a hasty or clumsy manner; – generally with up; as, to patch up a truce.
  • (computing) To make the changes a patch describes; to apply a patch to the files in question. Hence:
  • # To fix or improve a computer program without a complete upgrade.
  • # To make a quick and possibly temporary change to a program.
  • To connect two pieces of electrical equipment using a cable.
  • Synonyms
    * See also

    See also

    * diff * diff file

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (es)
  • (archaic) A paltry fellow; a rogue; a ninny; a fool.
  • * 1610 , , act 3 scene 2
  • What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch !

    Anagrams

    * ----

    zone

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Each of the five regions of the earth's surface into which it was divided by climatic differences, namely the torrid zone (between the tropics), two temperate zones (between the tropics and the polar circles), and two frigid zones (within the polar circles).
  • * , I.2.4.vi:
  • To avoid which, we will take any pains […]; we will dive to the bottom of the sea, to the bowels of the earth, five, six, seven, eight, nine hundred fathom deep, through all five zones , and both extremes of heat and cold […].
  • * 1841 , (George Bancroft), History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent , Volume 2, page 270,
  • And while idle curiosity may take its walk in shady avenues by the ocean side, commercedefies every wind, outrides every tempest, and invades every zone .
  • Any given region or area of the world.
  • A given area distinguished on the basis of a particular characteristic, use, restriction, etc.
  • There is a no-smoking zone that extends 25 feet outside of each entrance.
    The white zone is for loading and unloading only.
  • A band or area of growth encircling anything.
  • a zone''' of evergreens on a mountain; the '''zone of animal or vegetable life in the ocean around an island or a continent
  • A band or stripe extending around a body.
  • (crystallography) A series of planes having mutually parallel intersections.
  • (baseball) Short for the strike zone.
  • That pitch was low and away, just outside of the zone .
  • (chiefly, sports) A high-performance phase or period.
  • I just got in the zone late in the game: everything was going in.
  • (networking) That collection of a domain's DNS resource records, the domain and its subdomains]], that are not [[delegate, delegated to another authority.
  • (Apple computing) A logical group of network devices on AppleTalk.
  • A belt or girdle.
  • * 17th c , , 2005'', Pygmalion and the Statue'', Paul Hammond, David Hopkins (editors), ''The Poems of John Dryden: Volume Five: 1697-1700 , page 263,
  • Her tapered fingers too with rings are graced, / And an embroidered zone surrounds her slender waist.
  • * 1779 , , A Voyage to New Guinea and the Moluccas from Balambangan , page 21,
  • From the wai?t downwards, they wore a loo?e robe, girt with an embroidered zone or belt about the middle, with a large cla?p of gold, and a precious ?tone.
  • * 18th c', , ''The Passions: An Ode for Music'', '''1810 , Alexander Chalmers, Samuel Johnson (editors), ''The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper , Volume 13, page 204,
  • Love fram'd with Mirth a gay fantastic round, / Loose were her tresses seen, her zone unbound,
  • * 1819', Lord Byron, ''Don Juan'', Canto I, LV, '''1827 , ''The Works of Lord Byron, including The Suppressed Poems , page 565,
  • There was the Donna Julia, whom to call / Pretty were but to give a feeble notion / Of many charms in her as natural / As sweetness to the flower, or salt to ocean, / Her zone to Venus, or his bow to Cupid / (But this last simile is trite and stupid).
  • * 1844', (Charles Dickens), '''', '''1865 , ''Works of Charles Dickens'', Volume VI: ''Martin Chuzzlewit —Volume II, page 421,
  • it was the prettiest thing to see her girding on the precious little zone , and yet obliged to have assistance because her fingers were in such terrible perplexity; […].
  • (geometry) The curved surface of a frustum of a sphere, the portion of surface of a sphere delimited by parallel planes.
  • * 1835 , Charles Davies, David Brewster (editors and translators), , Elements of Geometry and Trigonometry'', [1794, ''Eléments de géométrie ], page 293,
  • To find the surface of a spherical zone .
    Rule.—Multiply the altitude of the zone by the circumference of a great circle of the sphere, and the product will be the surface (Book VIII. Prop. X. Sch. 1).
  • * 2014 , John Bird, Engineering Mathematics , page 183,
  • A zone of a sphere' is the curved surface of a frustum.Determine, correct to 3 significant figures (a) the volume of the frustum of the sphere, (b) the radius of the sphere and (c) the area of the ' zone formed.
  • (geometry, loosely, perhaps by meronymy) A frustum of a sphere.
  • A circuit; a circumference.
  • (Milton)

    Synonyms

    * (area distinguished on the basis of a particular characteristic etc) area, belt, district, region, section, sector, sphere, territory * * (high performance phase or period) * * *

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * demilitarized zone, DMZ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    See also

    * alb * epigonation * epimanikion * epitrachelion * maniple * mitre * omophorion * rhason * sakkos * sticharion * zone file

    Verb

  • To divide into or assign sections or areas.
  • Please zone off our staging area, a section for each group.
  • To define the property use classification of an area.
  • This area was zoned for industrial use.
  • To enter a daydream state temporarily, for instance as a result of boredom, fatigue, or intoxication; to doze off.
  • I must have zoned while he was giving us the directions.
    Everyone just put their goddamn heads together and zoned . (Byron Coley, liner notes for the album "Piece for Jetsun Dolma" by Thurston Moore)
  • To girdle or encircle.
  • Synonyms

    * (enter a daydream state) doze off, zone out

    Derived terms

    * * *

    See also

    * exclusion zone * friend zone * time zone * zone out * zoning law * zone of employment

    Anagrams

    * ----