Troop vs Zeriba - What's the difference?

troop | zeriba |


As nouns the difference between troop and zeriba

is that troop is a collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude while zeriba is a fence, particularly those once commonly improvised in northeastern africa from thornbushes.

As verbs the difference between troop and zeriba

is that troop is to move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops while zeriba is to erect or take refuge within a zereba.

troop

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
  • * Shakespeare
  • That which should accompany old age — / As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends — / I must not look to have.
  • (military) A small unit of cavalry or armour commanded by a captain, corresponding to a platoon or company of infantry.
  • A detachment of soldiers or police, especially horse artillery, armour, or state troopers.
  • Soldiers, military forces (usually "troops").
  • * Shakespeare
  • Farewell the plumed troop , and the big wars.
  • * Macaulay
  • His troops moved to victory with the precision of machines.
  • (nonstandard) A company of stageplayers; a troupe.
  • (label) A basic unit of girl or boy scouts, consisting of 6 to 10 youngsters.
  • A group of baboons.
  • A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.
  • (mycology) Mushrooms that are in a close group but not close enough to be called a cluster.
  • Derived terms

    * trooper * troopship * troop carrier

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, […], down the nave to the western door. […] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.}}
  • To march on; to go forward in haste.
  • To move or march as if in a crowd.
  • Derived terms

    * troop the colour (qualifier)

    References

    * *

    See also

    *

    Anagrams

    * English collective nouns ----

    zeriba

    English

    Alternative forms

    * zareba (particularly in figurative uses) * seriba, sariba * zerybeh * zereba, zareeba, zerriba

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fence, particularly those once commonly improvised in northeastern Africa from thornbushes.
  • * 1849 , O'Reilly translating Werne, Exped. Sources White Nile , II 112:
  • A shining seriba of reeds, the stalks of which ... perhaps only afford resistance to tame animals.
  • * 1895 , A. H. Keane translating W. Junker, Trav. in Afr. , I v 245:
  • The expression ‘'zeriba country ’ applied by some geographers to the northern slope of the Nile–Congo divide.
  • (label) An improvised stockade, particularly those similarly located and constructed.
  • * 1884 Mar. 11, Times , 5:
  • The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) advanced this morning to Baker Pasha's zariba .
  • (label) A camp of troops employing such an enclosure.
  • * 1887''' Apr. 9, ''Times , 5:
  • ...Forming a zariba , or square, to resist cavalry.
  • (label) Any wild and barbed barrier, evocative of a briar or thorn patch.
  • * 1910 , :
  • Once you had passed the initial zareba of fruit stands, souvenir stands, ice-cream stands, and the lair of the enthusiast whose aim in life it was to sell you picture post-cards, and had won through to the long walk where the seats were, you were practically alone with Nature.
  • * 1961 , P. G. Wodehouse, Ice in Bedroom , vii. 52:
  • Owing to his obiter dicta having to be filtered through a zareba of white hair, it was not always easy to catch exactly what Mr. Cornelius said.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To erect or take refuge within a zereba.
  • * 1885 July, 19th Cent. , 89:
  • The Brigadier ordered the force to zereba on the best position that was near.
  • * 1911 , "Somaliland" in the Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed., Vol. 25:
  • On the 2nd of June a small force, zeribaed under Captain Malcolm McNeill, was attacked by the mullah's followers but repulsed after desperate fighting.

    Anagrams

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