Clamor vs Yearn - What's the difference?

clamor | yearn |


In lang=en terms the difference between clamor and yearn

is that clamor is to influence by outcry while yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex.

As verbs the difference between clamor and yearn

is that clamor is to cry out and/or demand while yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

As a noun clamor

is a great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.

clamor

English

Alternative forms

* clamour (UK English)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.
  • Any loud and continued noise.
  • A continued public expression, often of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.
  • Synonyms

    * (great outcry) outcry, tumult

    Derived terms

    * clamorous * clamorously * clamorousness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cry out and/or demand.
  • ''Anyone who tastes our food seems to clamor for more.
  • To demand by outcry.
  • ''Thousands of demonstrators clamoring the government's resignation were literally deafening, yet their cries fell in deaf ears
  • * 2013 September 28, , " London Is Special, but Not That Special," New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
  • The distinctness of London has led many to clamor for the capital to pursue its own policies, especially on immigration. The British prime minister, David Cameron, is a Conservative. So is the mayor of London, Boris Johnson. But they have diametrically opposed views on immigration.
  • To become noisy insistently.
  • ''After a confused murmur the audience soon clamored
  • To influence by outcry.
  • ''His many supporters successfully clamor his election without a formal vote
  • (obsolete) To silence.
  • Synonyms

    * (to cry out) din

    Anagrams

    * ----

    yearn

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) giernan, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To long, have a strong desire (for something).
  • * All I yearn for is a simple life.
  • To long for something in the past with melancholy, nostalgically
  • To be pained or distressed; to grieve; to mourn.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Falstaff he is dead, and we must yearn therefore.
  • To pain; to grieve; to vex.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It would yearn your heart to see it.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It yearns me not if men my garments wear.
    Derived terms
    () * yearner * yearnful * yearnly * yearning * yearnsome * yearny

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (Scotland) To curdle, as milk.
  • Anagrams

    *