Breathe vs Yawn - What's the difference?

breathe | yawn |


As verbs the difference between breathe and yawn

is that breathe is to draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases while yawn is to open the mouth widely and take a long, rather deep breath, often because one is tired and sometimes accompanied by pandiculation.

As a noun yawn is

the action of ; opening the mouth widely and taking a long, rather deep breath, often because one is tired.

breathe

English

Verb

  • To draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases.
  • To take in needed gases and expel waste gases in a similar way.
  • :Fish have gills so they can breathe underwater.
  • To use (a gas) to sustain life.
  • :While life as we know it depends on oxygen, scientists have speculated that alien life forms might breathe chlorine or methane.
  • Figuratively, to live.
  • :I will not allow it, as long as I still breathe .
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:I am in health, I breathe .
  • *(rfdate) Sir Walter Scott
  • *:Breathes there a man with soul so dead?
  • To draw something into the lungs.
  • :Try not to breathe too much smoke.
  • To expel air from the lungs, exhale.
  • :If you breathe on a mirror, it will fog up.
  • To pass like breath; noiselessly or gently; to emanate; to blow gently.
  • :The wind breathes through the trees.
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:The air breathes upon us here most sweetly.
  • *(rfdate) Byron
  • *:There breathes a living fragrance from the shore.
  • To give an impression of, to exude.
  • :The decor positively breathes classical elegance.
  • To whisper quietly.
  • :He breathed the words into her ear, but she understood them all.
  • To exchange gases with the environment.
  • :Garments made of certain new materials breathe well and keep the skin relatively dry during exercise.
  • To rest; to stop and catch one's breath.
  • *:
  • *:Thenne they lasshed to gyder many sad strokes / & tracyd and trauercyd now bakward / now sydelyng hurtlyng to gyders lyke two bores / & that same tyme they felle both grouelyng to the erthe / Thus they fought styll withoute ony reposynge two houres and neuer brethed
  • *(rfdate) Shakespeare
  • *:Well! breathe awhile, and then to it again!
  • To stop, to give (a horse) an opportunity to catch its breath.
  • :At higher altitudes you need to breathe your horse more often.
  • Synonyms

    * (to draw air in and out) see

    Derived terms

    * *

    yawn

    English

    (wikipedia yawn)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To open the mouth widely and take a long, rather deep breath, often because one is tired and sometimes accompanied by pandiculation.
  • I could see my students yawning , so I knew the lesson was boring them.
  • * Trumbull
  • And while above he spends his breath, / The yawning audience nod beneath.
  • To present a wide opening.
  • The canyon yawns as it has done for millions of years, and we stand looking, dumbstruck.
    Death yawned before us, and I hit the brakes.
  • * Shakespeare
  • 'Tis now the very witching time of night, / When churchyards yawn .
  • To open the mouth, or to gape, through surprise or bewilderment.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To be eager; to desire to swallow anything; to express desire by yawning.
  • to yawn for fat livings
  • * Landor
  • one long, yawning gaze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The action of ; opening the mouth widely and taking a long, rather deep breath, often because one is tired.
  • A particularly boring event.
  • The slideshow we sat through was such a yawn . I was glad when it finished.

    Derived terms

    * multicolour yawn * Technicolor yawn * yawnfest

    Anagrams

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