Ya vs Yah - What's the difference?

ya | yah |


As a verb ya

is to teem.

As a proper noun yah is

.

ya

English

Etymology 1

Reduced form of you. Compare Dutch je, reduced/unstressed form of .

Pronoun

(English Pronouns)
  • Yo homes, smell ya later!
    Usage notes
    Only used in unstressed contexts.
    Derived terms
    * -cha * chewie on ya boot * -ja * love ya * see ya * smell ya later * there ya go * whaddaya

    See also

    * yer

    Etymology 2

    Apparently from (etyl) ja and cognates in other Germanic languages; related to English yeah.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (informal) Yeah, yes.
  • Etymology 3

    Variation of hyah.

    Interjection

    (en-interjection)
  • (informal) Go. (Spoken to horses and cattle.)
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) ya, from (etyl) . More at yea.

    Alternative forms

    * yaa, yaw, yah, yha

    Adverb

    (-)
  • yea; yes
  • * 1806 , Jamieson, Pop. Ballads :
  • 'Ya , wilt thou!' said Wallace, 'then tak thee that, [...]'
  • * 1894 , W. G. Stevenson, Puddin' iii. :
  • Ya , auld man, ye ken fine ye wad like me.
  • * 1896 , Ackworth, Clog Shop Chron. :
  • Ya , bur 'ee did, [...]

    Etymology 5

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A letter of the Cyrillic alphabet.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    yah

    English

    Etymology 1

    An alternative pronunciation, akin to yeah.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (UK, India, South Africa) Yes.
  • Yah , we did go along but it turned out the wedding was a load of nonsense.

    Etymology 2

    From the pronunciation of “yes” which such people use.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (British, informal) An upper-class person, especially a Sloane Ranger.
  • Anagrams

    * * * English location adverbs ----