Bylaw vs Writ - What's the difference?

bylaw | writ | Related terms |

Bylaw is a related term of writ.


As nouns the difference between bylaw and writ

is that bylaw is a local custom or law of a settlement or district while writ is (legal) a written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something.

As a verb writ is

(dated|nonstandard).

bylaw

English

Alternative forms

* byrlaw (obsolete) * by-law, bye-law, byelaw

Noun

(en noun)
  • A local custom or law of a settlement or district.
  • A rule made by a local authority to regulate its own affairs.
  • A law or rule governing the internal affairs of an organization (e.g., corporation or business).
  • See also

    * bylaw officer

    writ

    English

    (wikipedia writ)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) A written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something.
  • authority, power to enforce compliance
  • * '>citation
  • We can't let them take advantage of the fact that there are so many areas of the world where no one's writ runs.
  • (obsolete) that which is written; writing
  • * Spenser
  • Then to his hands that writ he did betake, / Which he disclosing read, thus as the paper spake.
  • * Knolles
  • Babylon, so much spoken of in Holy Writ

    Derived terms

    * drop the writ * Holy Writ * writ of habeas corpus

    References

    * Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia (Webster)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (dated, nonstandard)
  • (Dryden)
  • * (Omar Khayyam) (in translation)
  • The moving finger writes, and having writ , not all your piety or wit can lure it back to cancel half a line

    Usage notes

    * The form writ'' survives in standard dialects only in the phrase ''writ large , though it remains common in some dialects (e.g. Scouse).