Squeeze vs Wrench - What's the difference?

squeeze | wrench | Related terms |

Squeeze is a related term of wrench.


In lang=en terms the difference between squeeze and wrench

is that squeeze is to put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices while wrench is to use the tool known as a wrench.

In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between squeeze and wrench

is that squeeze is (archaic) a bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in china while wrench is (archaic) a winch or windlass.

As verbs the difference between squeeze and wrench

is that squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once while wrench is (obsolete) to violently move in a turn or writhe.

As nouns the difference between squeeze and wrench

is that squeeze is a difficult position while wrench is (obsolete) a trick or artifice.

squeeze

English

Verb

(squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze

    wrench

    English

    (wikipedia wrench)

    Alternative forms

    * ** wrenche * ** wrinche * ** wringe

    Noun

    (wrenches)
  • (obsolete) A trick or artifice.
  • * c. 1210 , MS. Cotton Caligula A IX f.246
  • Mon mai longe liues wene; / Ac ofte him liedh the wrench .
  • (obsolete) Deceit; guile; treachery.
  • A movement that twists or pulls violently; a tug.
  • * 1897 , (Bram Stoker), (Dracula) Chapter 21
  • With a wrench , which threw his victim back upon the bed as though hurled from a height, he turned and sprang at us.
  • An injury caused by a violent twisting or pulling of a limb; strain, sprain.
  • (obsolete) A turn at an acute angle.
  • (archaic) A winch or windlass.
  • (obsolete) A screw.
  • A distorting change from the original meaning.
  • (US) A hand tool for making rotational adjustments, such as fitting nuts and bolts, or fitting pipes; a spanner.
  • A violent emotional change caused by separation.
  • (physics) In screw theory, a screw assembled from force and torque vectors arising from application of Newton's laws to a rigid body.
  • (obsolete) means; contrivance
  • (Francis Bacon)

    Synonyms

    * (tool) spanner (UK, Australia)

    Derived terms

    * adjustable wrench * socket wrench * monkey-wrench, monkey wrench, monkeywrench * pipe wrench * screw wrench * torque wrench * torsion wrench * tube wrench * dog bone wrench

    Verb

    (es)
  • (obsolete) To violently move in a turn or writhe.
  • To pull or twist violently.
  • With a surge of adrenaline, she wrenched the car door off and pulled out the injured man.
  • (obsolete) To turn aside or deflect.
  • (obsolete) To slander.
  • (obsolete) To tighten with or as if with a winch.
  • To injure (a joint) by pulling or twisting.
  • Be careful not to wrench your ankle walking along those loose stones!
  • To distort from the original meaning.
  • (obsolete) To thrust a weapon in a twisting motion.
  • (intransitive, fencing, obsolete) To disarm an opponent by whirling his or her blade away.
  • To rack with pain.
  • To deprive by means of a violent pull or twist.
  • To use the tool known as a wrench.
  • The plumber wrenched the pipes until they came loose.