Craw vs Wraw - What's the difference?

craw | wraw |


As a noun craw

is (archaic) the stomach of an animal.

As a verb craw

is (archaic) to caw, crow, for certain birds to make their cry.

As an adjective wraw is

(obsolete) angry; vexed; wrathful.

craw

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (archaic) The stomach of an animal.
  • The crop of a bird.
  • Synonyms

    * crop * gullet

    Derived terms

    * stick in one’s craw

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) to caw, crow, for certain birds to make their cry
  • *{{quote-book, year=1828, author=David Macbeth Moir, title=The Life of Mansie Wauch, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=The night was now pitmirk; the wind soughed amid the head-stones and railings of the gentry, (for we must all die,) and the black corbies in the steeple-holes cackled and crawed in a fearsome manner. }}

    wraw

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) angry; vexed; wrathful
  • With this speech the cock wex wroth and wraw . — Chaucer.
    (Webster 1913)