What is the difference between woodwind and flute?

woodwind | flute |


In context|musical instruments|lang=en terms the difference between woodwind and flute

is that woodwind is (musical instruments) any (mostly wooden) musical instrument which produce sound by the player blowing into them, through a reed, or across an opening woodwind instruments include the recorder, flute, piccolo, clarinet, oboe, cor anglais and bassoon while flute is (musical instruments) a woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo tube with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp edge, while covering none, some or all of the holes with the fingers to vary the note played.

As nouns the difference between woodwind and flute

is that woodwind is (musical instruments) any (mostly wooden) musical instrument which produce sound by the player blowing into them, through a reed, or across an opening woodwind instruments include the recorder, flute, piccolo, clarinet, oboe, cor anglais and bassoon while flute is (musical instruments) a woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo tube with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp edge, while covering none, some or all of the holes with the fingers to vary the note played.

As a adjective woodwind

is related to a woodwind instrument.

As a verb flute is

to play on a [[#noun|flute]].

woodwind

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (musical instruments) Any (mostly wooden) musical instrument which produce sound by the player blowing into them, through a reed, or across an opening. Woodwind instruments include the recorder, flute, piccolo, clarinet, oboe, cor anglais and bassoon.
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • Related to a woodwind instrument.
  • flute

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) flaute, from (etyl) flaut, ultimately from three possibilities: * Blend of Provencal * From Latin * Imitative.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (musical instruments) A woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo tube with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp edge, while covering none, some or all of the holes with the fingers to vary the note played.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The breathing flute's soft notes are heard around.
  • A glass with a long, narrow bowl and a long stem, used for drinking wine, especially champagne.
  • a lengthwise groove, such as one of the lengthwise grooves on a can escape
  • (architecture, firearms) A semicylindrical vertical groove, as in a pillar, in plaited cloth, or in a rifle barrel to cut down the weight.
  • A long French bread roll.
  • (Simmonds)
  • An organ stop with a flute-like sound.
  • Derived terms
    * pan flute * skin flute
    See also
    * bansuri

    Verb

  • To play on a .
  • To make a flutelike sound.
  • To utter with a flutelike sound.
  • *
  • To form flutes or channels in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
  • Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) ?, (etyl) fluit.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kind of flyboat; a storeship.