Wound vs Womb - What's the difference?

wound | womb |


As nouns the difference between wound and womb

is that wound is an injury, such as a cut, stab, or tear, to a (usually external) part of the body while womb is (anatomy) in female mammals, the organ in which the young are conceived and grow until birth; the uterus.

As verbs the difference between wound and womb

is that wound is to hurt or injure (someone) by cutting, piercing, or tearing the skin or wound can be (wind) while womb is (obsolete) to enclose in a womb, or as if in a womb; to breed or hold in secret.

wound

English

Etymology 1

Noun from (etyl) wund, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • An injury, such as a cut, stab, or tear, to a (usually external) part of the body.
  • * 2013 , Phil McNulty, "[http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/23830980]", BBC Sport , 1 September 2013:
  • The visitors were without Wayne Rooney after he suffered a head wound in training, which also keeps him out of England's World Cup qualifiers against Moldova and Ukraine.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Showers of blood / Rained from the wounds of slaughtered Englishmen.
  • * 1883:
  • I went below, and did what I could for my wound ; it pained me a good deal, and still bled freely; but it was neither deep nor dangerous, nor did it greatly gall me when I used my arm.
  • (figuratively) A hurt to a person's feelings, reputation, etc.
  • It took a long time to get over the wound of that insult.
  • An injury to a person by which the skin is divided or its continuity broken.
  • Synonyms
    * (injury) injury, lesion * (sense, something that offends a person's feelings) slight, slur, insult * See also
    Derived terms
    * dirty wound * entry wound * exit wound * flesh wound * rub salt in the wound * suck one's wounds * time heals all wounds

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To hurt or injure (someone) by cutting, piercing, or tearing the skin.
  • The police officer wounded the suspect during the fight that ensued.
  • To hurt (a person's feelings).
  • The actor's pride was wounded when the leading role went to his rival.
    Synonyms
    * (injure) hurt, injure * offend

    Etymology 2

    See (Etymology 2)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (wind)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=1 citation , passage=“[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck?; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”}} English heteronyms English irregular past participles English irregular simple past forms

    womb

    English

    (uterus)

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (dialectal)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (anatomy) In female mammals, the organ in which the young are conceived and grow until birth; the uterus.
  • (obsolete) The abdomen or stomach.
  • *:
  • *:And his hede, hym semed,was enamyled with asure, and his shuldyrs shone as the golde, and his wombe was lyke mayles of a merveylous hew.
  • (obsolete) The stomach of a person or creature.
  • *1395 , (John Wycliffe), Bible , Jonah II:
  • *:And þe Lord made redi a gret fish þat he shulde swolewe Ionas; and Ionas was in wombe of þe fish þre da?es and þre ni?tis.
  • (figuratively) A place where something is made or formed.
  • *Dryden
  • *:The womb of earth the genial seed receives.
  • Any cavity containing and enveloping anything.
  • *Robert Browning
  • *:The centre spike of gold / Which burns deep in the bluebell's womb .
  • Synonyms

    * (organ in mammals) uterus, matrix (poetic or literary''), belly (''poetic or literary )

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To enclose in a womb, or as if in a womb; to breed or hold in secret.
  • (Shakespeare)