Conscious vs Wise - What's the difference?

conscious | wise |


As an adjective conscious

is alert, awake.

As an acronym wise is

(aviation|nautical) (adjective).

conscious

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Alert, awake.
  • Aware.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.}}
  • *
  • Once again the animals were conscious of a vague uneasiness.
  • Aware of one's own existence; aware of one's own awareness.
  • * 1999 , Eckhart Tolle, The Power of Now , Hodder and Stoughton, pages 61–62:
  • The best indicator of your level of consciousness is how you deal with life's challenges when they come.  Through those challenges, an already unconscious person tends to become more deeply unconscious, and a conscious' person more intensely ' conscious .

    Antonyms

    * asleep * unaware * unconscious

    Derived terms

    * consciously * consciousness * subconscious * unconscious * preconscious * price-conscious * self-conscious

    wise

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) wis, wys, from (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch wijs, German weise, Swedish vis. Compare wit.

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Showing good judgement or the benefit of experience.
  • Storing extra food for the winter was a wise decision.
    They were considered the wise old men of the administration.
    "It is a profitable thing, if one is wise , to seem foolish" - Aeschylus
  • (colloquial) Disrespectful.
  • Don't get wise with me!
    Usage notes
    * Objects: person, decision, advice, counsel, saying, etc.
    Antonyms
    * unwise * foolish
    Derived terms
    * crack wise * wisdom * wiseacre * wise apple * wiseass * wisecrack * wise guy * wise-hearted * wiseling * wiselike * wiseness * wizen * wizard * word to the wise

    Verb

    (wis)
  • To become wise.
  • (ergative, slang) Usually with "up", to inform or learn.
  • Mo wised him up about his situation.
    ''After Mo had a word with him, he wised up.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) Way, manner, method.
  • * 1850 , The Burden of Nineveh , lines 2-5
  • ... the prize
    Dead Greece vouchsafes to living eyes, —
    Her Art for ever in fresh wise
    From hour to hour rejoicing me.
  • * 1866 , , A Ballad of Life , lines 28-30
  • A riven hood was pulled across his eyes;
    The token of him being upon this wise
    Made for a sign of Lust.
  • * 1926 , J. S. Fletcher, Sea Fog , page 308
  • And within a few minutes the rest of us were on our way too, judiciously instructed by Parkapple and the Brighton official, and disposed of in two taxi-cabs, the drivers of which were ordered to convey us to Rottingdean in such wise that each set his load of humanity at different parts of the village and at the same time that the bus was due to arrive at the hotel.
    Derived terms
    * -wise

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

  • (dialectal) to instruct
  • (dialectal) to advise; induce
  • (dialectal) to show the way, guide
  • (dialectal) to direct the course of, pilot
  • (dialectal) to cause to turn