Cool vs Winter - What's the difference?

cool | winter |


As an acronym cool

is (computing) clips object]]-oriented [[language|language .

As a proper noun winter is

(a common germanic one).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

cool

English

Alternative forms

* (slang) coo, kewl, kool, qewl, qool

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . Related to (l).

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a slightly low temperature; mildly or pleasantly cold.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet:
  • Allowing or suggesting heat relief.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • Of a person, not showing emotion, calm and in self-control.
  • Unenthusiastic, lukewarm, skeptical.
  • Calmly audacious.
  • * (Nathaniel Hawthorne) (1804-1864)
  • Its cool stare of familiarity was intolerable.
  • * 1944 November 28, Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe, Meet Me in St. Louis , Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
  • My father was talking to the World's Fair Commission yesterday, and they estimate it's going to cost a cool fifty million.
  • (label) Of a person, knowing what to do and how to behave; considered popular by others.
  • (label) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally hipster slang.
  • * 2008 , Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in'' Nate Green, ''Built for Show , page xii
  • The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  • (label) Of an action, all right; acceptable; that does not present a problem.
  • (label) A dismissal of a comment perceived as boring or pointless.
  • (label) Of a person, not upset by circumstances that might ordinarily be upsetting.
  • * (Henry Fielding) (1707-1754)
  • He had lost a cool hundred.
  • * (Charles Dickens) (1812-1870)
  • leaving a cool four thousand to Mr. Matthew Pocket
    Synonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) chilly * (not showing emotion) distant, phlegmatic, standoffish, unemotional * (in fashion) ** (standard) , fashionable, in fashion, modish, stylish ** (colloquial or slang) happening, hip, in, trendy * (acceptable) acceptable, all right, OK * (not upset) easy, fine, not bothered, not fussed'''
    Antonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) lukewarm, tepid, warm * (not showing emotion) passionate * (knowing what to do and how to behave) awkward, uncool * (in fashion) , old hat, out, out of fashion * (acceptable) not cricket (UK), not on, unacceptable * (not upset) bothered, upset * (unenthusiastic) warm
    Derived terms
    * cool head * coolish * coolly * coolness * keep one's cool * lose one's cool * uncool
    Quotations
    * The earliest use of the word in this way seems to be in ' "The Moonstone" 1868: *: "She has been a guest of yours at this house," I answered. "May I venture to suggest — if nothing was said about me beforehand — that I might see her here?" *: "Cool!" said Mr. Bruff. With that one word of comment on the reply that I had made to him, he took another turn up and down the room. *: "In plain English," he said, "my house is to be turned into a trap to catch Rachel ... * In 1602, Shakespeare wrote that Queen Gertrude told Hamlet: *: "O gentle son, Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, Sprinkle cool patience."

    Noun

    (-)
  • A moderate or refreshing state of cold; moderate temperature of the air between hot and cold; coolness.
  • in the cool of the morning
  • A calm temperament.
  • Synonyms
    *(calm temperament) calmness, composure

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) colen, from (etyl) , altered to resemble the adjective cool. See (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (literally) To lose heat, to get colder.
  • I like to let my tea cool before drinking it so I don't burn my tongue.
  • To make cooler, less warm.
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 24:
  • Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue.
  • (figuratively) To become less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • Relations cooled between the USA and the USSR after 1980.
  • To make less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • * Shakespeare:
  • We have reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal stings, our unbitted lusts.
    Derived terms
    * coolant * cooler * cooling * cool off * cool down * cool it * cool one's heels * cool one's jets

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    winter

    English

    (wikipedia winter)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Traditionally the fourth of the four seasons, typically regarded as being from December 23 to March 20 in continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere or the months of June, July and August in the Southern Hemisphere. It is the time when the sun is lowest in the sky, resulting in short days, and the time of year with the lowest atmospheric temperatures for the region.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= a1420 , year_published= 1894 , author= The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056 , by= (Lanfranc of Milan) , title= Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie." , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=6XktAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA63 , original= , chapter= Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone , section= , isbn= 1163911380 , edition= , publisher= K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co , location= London , editor= Robert von Fleischhacker , volume= , page= 63 , passage= Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir , & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.}}
  • * Shakespeare
  • And after summer evermore succeeds / Barren winter , with his wrathful nipping cold.
  • (figuratively) The period of decay, old age, death, or the like.
  • * Wordsworth
  • Life's autumn past, I stand on winter's verge.

    Usage notes

    (season name spelling)

    Derived terms

    * AI winter * (Arctic Winter Games) * atomic winter * Austrian winter pea * beady-legged winter horse tick * bewinter * blackberry winter * blackthorn winter * buy straw hats in winter * Chinese winter squash * dogwood winter * early winter cress * East Indian winter jet * (Father Winter) * (Fell Winter) * Fimbulwinter * forwintered * General winter * impact winter * in-winter * Kondratiev winter * (Long Winter) * love-in-winter * Madeira winter cherry * meteorological winter * mid-winter, midwinter * nuclear winter * (Old Man Winter) * (Operation Dark Winter) * out-winter, outwinter * overwinter * rere-winter * Russian winter * Soviet winter * Spencer's winter vomiting * summer and winter * twinter * unwinter * volcanic winter * (Western Winter Blast) * wild winterpea * winter aconite * winterage, winteridge * winter and winter * winter annual * winter apple * winter barley * winter-beaten * winter berry, winterberry * winter bloom, winter-bloom * winter break * winter bud * winter bunting * winter carnival * winter cherry * Winter Circle * winter city * winter-clad * winter-close * winter clover * winter cluster * (Winter Coast) * winter coat * winter corn * winter cough * winter count * winter country * winter-crack * winter cress, wintercress * winter crookneck, winter crookneck squash * winter crop * winter currant * winter daffodil * winter depression * winter duck * winter dysentery * winter eczema * wintered * (Winter-een-mas) * winter egg * winter falcon * winter fallow * winter fat * winter-feed, winterfeed * winter fern * Winterfest * winter fever * winter finch * winter flounder * winter-flower * winter flowering cherry * (Winterfresh) * Winter Games * winter garden * winter gillyflower * winter gnat * winter grape * winter greens * winter-ground * winter guard * winter gull, winter-gull * winter-hained * (Winter Harbor), (Winter Harbour) * winter-hardy, winterhardy * (Winterhaven), (Winter Haven) * winter hawk * winter hazel * winter heath * winter heliotrope * winter hellebore * winter hemp * Winter Hexagon * (Winter Hill) * winter holidays * winter-house * winter ice * winterim * winterise, winterize * winterish * (Winter Island) * winter itch * winter jasmine * winter-killed * (Winter King) * winterless * (Winter Line) * winterling * winter lodge, winter lodgment * winter-long * winter-love * Winterlude * (Winter Magic Festival) * winter marjoram * winter melon, winter melon vine * winter mew, winter-mew * winter midge * winter monsoon * winter moth * winter mushroom * winter oats * (Winter of Discontent) * winter oil * winter-old * Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics * winter ova * winter packet * (Winter Palace) * (Winter Park) * winter peach * winter pear * winter-pick * winter-piece * winter-pride * winter-pround * winter purslane * winter quarters * (Winter Queen) * winter queening * winter range * winter rape * winter redbird * winter-rig * winter road * winter rocket * winter rose * winter rules * winter-run fish * winter rye * winters * winter savory * winter scours * winter shad, winter-shad * winter sheldrake * winter sleep * winter sleeper * winter snipe * winter solstice * wintersome * winter sport * (Winter Springs) * winter squash * winter-stall * winter storm * winter story * (Winterstown) * winter strawberry * (Wintersville) * winter sweet, winter-sweet, wintersweet * winter sweet marjoram * winter tale * winter teal * winter-thorn * winter tick * winter-tide, wintertide * winter-time, wintertime * winter tire, winter tyre * Winter Triangle * winter urn * winter vacation * Winterval * (Winterville) * winter visitor * winter vomiting disease * winter wagtail * (Winter War) * winterward, winterwards * winter warfare * winter wash * winter weather advisory * winter-weed, winterweed * winter-weight, winterweight * winter wheat * (Winter White House) * winter white Russian hamster * winter wicket * winter woolies, winter woollies * winter worm * winter worm summer grass * winter wren * wintrous

    See also

    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To spend the winter (in a particular place).
  • ''When they retired, they hoped to winter in Florida.
  • To store something (for instance animals) somewhere over winter to protect it from cold.
  • Derived terms

    * Wintered Over Device * winterer * wintering

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----