Winch vs Windlass - What's the difference?

winch | windlass |


As nouns the difference between winch and windlass

is that winch is a machine consisting of a drum on an axle, a pawl, and a crank handle, with or without gearing, to give increased mechanical advantage when hauling on a rope while windlass is any of various forms of winch, in which a rope or cable is wound around a cylinder, used for lifting heavy weights.

As verbs the difference between winch and windlass

is that winch is to use a winch or winch can be to wince; to shrink while windlass is to raise with, or as if with, a windlass; to use a windlass.

winch

English

(wikipedia winch)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), from (etyl) *winkjo- , ultimately from the (etyl) root , whence also (l).

Noun

(es)
  • A machine consisting of a drum on an axle, a pawl, and a crank handle, with or without gearing, to give increased mechanical advantage when hauling on a rope.
  • (nautical) A hoisting machine used for loading or discharging cargo, or for hauling in lines. (FM 55-501).
  • * 2013 , . Melbourne, Australia: The Text Publishing Company. chapter 27. p. 267.
  • *:It runs on clattering steel tracks; the driver sits in a cab over the tracks, operating the controls that rotate the arm and turn the winch .
  • A wince (machine used in dyeing or steeping cloth).
  • A kick, as of an animal, from impatience or uneasiness.
  • (Shelton)

    Verb

    (es)
  • To use a winch
  • Winch in those sails, lad!

    Etymology 2

    See wince.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To wince; to shrink
  • To kick with impatience or uneasiness.
  • windlass

    Noun

    (es)
  • Any of various forms of winch, in which a rope or cable is wound around a cylinder, used for lifting heavy weights
  • A winding and circuitous way; a roundabout course.
  • * 1599 , , Ham II. i. 65:
  • With windlasses and with assays of bias, / By indirections find directions out.
  • An apparatus resembling a winch or windlass, for bending the bow of an arblast, or crossbow.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Verb

  • To raise with, or as if with, a windlass; to use a windlass.
  • (The Century)
  • To take a roundabout course; to work warily or by indirect means.
  • (Hammond)