Widest vs Wildest - What's the difference?

widest | wildest |


As adjectives the difference between widest and wildest

is that widest is (wide) while wildest is (wild).

widest

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (wide)
  • Anagrams

    *

    wide

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Having a large physical extent from side to side.
  • Large in scope.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Fenella Saunders
  • , title= Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.}}
  • (sports) Operating at the side of the playing area.
  • On one side or the other of the mark; too far sideways from the mark, the wicket, the batsman, etc.
  • * Spenser
  • Surely he shoots wide on the bow hand.
  • * Massinger
  • I was but two bows wide .
  • (phonetics, dated) Made, as a vowel, with a less tense, and more open and relaxed, condition of the organs in the mouth.
  • Remote; distant; far.
  • * Hammond
  • the contrary being so wide from the truth of Scripture and the attributes of God
  • (obsolete) Far from truth, propriety, necessity, etc.
  • * Milton
  • our wide expositors
  • * Latimer
  • It is far wide that the people have such judgments.
  • * Herbert
  • How wide is all this long pretence!
  • (computing) Of or supporting a greater range of text characters than can fit into the traditional representation.
  • a wide''' character; a '''wide stream

    Antonyms

    * narrow (regarding empty area) * thin (regarding occupied area) * skinny (sometimes offensive, regarding body width)

    Adverb

    (er)
  • extensively
  • He travelled far and wide .
  • completely
  • He was wide awake.
  • away from a given goal
  • The arrow fell wide of the mark.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The Reds carved the first opening of the second period as Glen Johnson's pull-back found David Ngog but the Frenchman hooked wide from six yards.}}
  • So as to leave or have a great space between the sides; so as to form a large opening.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (cricket) A ball that passes so far from the batsman that the umpire deems it unplayable; the arm signal used by an umpire to signal a wide; the extra run added to the batting side's score
  • 1000 English basic words ----

    wildest

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (wild)

  • wild

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Untamed; not domesticated.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Winter's not gone yet, if the wild geese fly that way.
  • * Milton
  • The woods and desert caves, / With wild thyme and gadding vine o'ergrown.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • (senseid) Unrestrained or uninhibited.
  • Raucous, unruly, or licentious.
  • Visibly and overtly anxious; frantic.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=August 7, author=Chris Bevan, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Man City 2-3 Man Utd , passage=City, in contrast, were lethargic in every area of the pitch and their main contribution in the first half-hour was to keep referee Phil Dowd busy, with Micah Richards among four of their players booked early on, in his case for a wild lunge on Young.}}
  • Disheveled, tangled, or untidy.
  • Enthusiastic.
  • Inaccurate.
  • Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered.
  • a wild roadstead
  • (nautical) Hard to steer; said of a vessel.
  • (mathematics, of a knot) Not capable of being represented as a finite closed polygonal chain.
  • Antonyms

    * (mathematics) tame

    Derived terms

    * in the wild * walk on the wild side * wild allspice * wild and woolly * wild animal * wild balsam apple * wild basil * wild blueberry * wild boar * wild bugloss * wild camomile * wild card * wildcard * wildcarrot * wild cat * wildcat * wildcat strike * wildcatter * wild celery * wild cherry * wild child * wildcrafting * wild cumin * wild drake * wildebeest * wild elder * wilden * wilder * wilderness * wildest * wild-eyed * wildfire * wildflower * wildfowl * wild geranium * wild ginger * wild goose * wild goose chase * wild-goose chase * wild hyacinth * wilding * wild Irishman * wildish * wild land * wild licorice * wildlife * wildly * wild mammee * wild marjoram * wild mustard * wildness * wild oat * wild pieplant * wild pigeon * wild pink * wild pitch * wild plantain * wild plum * wild purslane * wild rice * wild rye * wild Spaniard * wild strawberry * wildstyle * wild turkey * wild vanilla * Wild West * wildwood

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Inaccurately; not on target.
  • The javelin flew wild and struck a spectator, to the horror of all observing.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The undomesticated state of a wild animal
  • After mending the lion's leg, we returned him to the wild
  • (chiefly, in the plural) a wilderness
  • * 1730–1774 , Oliver Goldsmith, Introductory to Switzerland
  • Thus every good his native wilds impart
    Imprints the patriot passion on his heart;
    And e’en those ills that round his mansion rise
    Enhance the bliss his scanty funds supplies.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To commit random acts of assault, robbery, and rape in an urban setting, especially as a gang.
  • * 1989 , David E. Pitt, Jogger's Attackers Terrorized at Least 9 in 2 Hours , New York Times (April 22, 1989), page 1:
  • *:: ...Chief of Detectives Robert Colangelo, who said the attacks appeared unrelated to money, race, drugs, or alcohol, said that some of the 20 youths brought in for questioning has told investigators that the crime spree was the product of a pastime called "wilding".
  • *:: "It's not a term that we in the police had heard before," the chief said, noting that the police were unaware of any similar incident in the park recently. "They just said, 'We were going wilding.' In my mind at this point, it implies that they were going to raise hell."...
  • Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----