White vs Wight - What's the difference?

white | wight |


As a proper noun white

is .

As a noun wight is

(archaic) a living creature, especially a human being.

As an adjective wight is

(archaic except in dialects ) brave, valorous, strong.

white

English

Alternative forms

* (l), (l), (l) (obsolete)

Adjective

(er)
  • Bright and colourless; reflecting equal quantities of all frequencies of visible light.
  • * (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) (1807-1882)
  • white as the whitest lily on a stream.
  • * 1962' (quoting '''1381 text), (Hans Kurath) & Sherman M. Kuhn, eds., ''(Middle English Dictionary) , Ann Arbor, Mich.: (University of Michigan Press), , page 1242:
  • dorr?&
  • 773;, d?r? adj. & n. toste wyte bred and do yt in dischis, and god Almande mylk.
  • Of the Caucasian race.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1949, chapter=The Green Book, author=Wendell P. Alston, page=3
  • , title=The Negro Motorist Green Book, edition=1949, location=New York, publisher=Victor H. Green , passage=
  • Designated for use by Caucasians.
  • Relatively light or pale in colour.
  • Pale or pallid, as from fear, illness, etc.
  • * (Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • Or whispering with white lips, "The foe! / They come! they come!"
  • (label) Containing cream, milk or creamer.
  • The standard denomination of the playing pieces of a board game deemed to belong to the white set, no matter what the actual colour.
  • Pertaining to an ecclesiastical order whose adherents dress in white habits; Cistercian.
  • * :
  • NOw rydeth Galahalt yet withouten shelde / and so rode four dayes without ony aduenture / And at the fourth day after euensonge / he came to a whyte Abbay / and there was he receyued with grete reuerence / and ledde vnto a chambre / and there was he vnarmed / And thenne was he ware of knyghtes of the table round
  • Honourable, fair; decent.
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • White as thy fame, and as thy honour clear.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • No whiter page than Addison's remains.
  • *
  • * 1953 , (Raymond Chandler), The Long Goodbye , Penguin, 2010, p.12:
  • *:‘We've only met twice and you've been more than white to me both times.’
  • *
  • Lacking coloration from ultraviolet light.
  • Grey, as from old age; having silvery hair; hoary.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • Your high engendered battles 'gainst a head / So old and white as this.
  • (label) Characterized by freedom from that which disturbs, and the like; fortunate; happy; favourable.
  • * Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • On the whole, however, the dominie reckoned this as one of the white days of his life.
  • (label) Regarded with especial favour; favourite; darling.
  • * (Geoffrey Chaucer) (c.1343-1400)
  • Come forth, my white spouse.
  • * (1586-c.1639)
  • I am his white boy, and will not be gulled.
  • (label) Pertaining to constitutional or anti-revolutionary political parties or movements.
  • * 1932 , (Duff Cooper), Talleyrand , Folio Society, 2010, p.163:
  • Aimée de Coigny had always adopted with enthusiasm the political views of her ruling lover and she had thus already held nearly every shade of opinion from red republicanism to white reaction.

    Antonyms

    * (bright and colourless) black, nonwhite, unwhite * (of coffee) black * (lacking coloration) tanned

    Synonyms

    * (lacking coloration) fair, pale

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The color/colour of snow or milk; the colour of light containing equal amounts of all visible wavelengths.
  • A Caucasian person.
  • The albumen of bird eggs (egg white).
  • (anatomy) The sclera, white of the eye.
  • Any butterfly of the Pieris genus.
  • (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) The cue ball in cue games.
  • (countable, and, uncountable) wine.
  • * {{quote-song
  • , year = 1977 , title = (Scenes from an Italian Restaurant) , composer = (Billy Joel) , album = , passage = A bottle of red, a bottle of white / It all depends upon your appetite / I'll meet you any time you want / In our Italian Restaurant. }}
  • (slang) Street name for cocaine.
  • (archery) The central part of the butt, which was formerly painted white; the centre of a mark at which a missile is shot.
  • * Shakespeare
  • 'Twas I won the wager, though you hit the white .
  • A white pigment.
  • Venice white

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from "white") * black-and-white * egg white * flake white * flat white * great white shark * honorary white * Large White * non-white * off-white,offwhite * snow-white * Snow White * titanium white * white heat * white admiral * white alkali * white area * white as a sheet * white as driven snow * white ash * white as snow * White Australia Policy * white bacon * white bear * white belt * white blood cell * white book * white bread * white bryony * white cell * white chip * white Chirstmas * white chocolate * white cloud * white clover * white coal * white corpuscle * white crappie * white currant * white dwarf * white elephant * White Ensign * white feather * white fish * white flag * white flight * white flour * white fox * white frost * white gasoline * white gold * white goods * white gum * white hole * white hope * white horse * White House * white hunter * white knight * white lady * white lead * white leather * white lie * white light * white lightning * white lime * white line * white list * white magic * white man * white marlin * white matter * white meat * white metal * white mica * white mustard * white night * white noise * white out * white pages * white pepper * white pointer * white power * white pudding * white radish * white rice * white room * white rust * white sale * white sapphire * White Sea * white sheep * white-shoe * white space * white spirit * white stick * white sugar * white tie * white vitriol * white water * white wedding * white witch * whitebait * whitebeam * whiteboard * white-bread * white-breasted sea eagle * whitecap * whitecoat * white-collar * white-collar crime * white-collar worker * white-crowned sparrow * whitecurrant * whitedamp * white-eye * whiteface * white-faced * white-faced heron * whitefly * white-footed mouse * white-glove building * white-haired * white-headed * white-hot * white-knuckle * white-kuckle ride * white-livered * whitely * whiten * whiteness * white-out * whiter than white * whites * white-shoe firm * white-sided dolphin * whitesmith * white-tablecloth restaurant * whitethroat * white-tie * whitewall * whitewall tire * whitewash * whitewater rafting * whitish

    See also

    * * leucite * leukoma * leukosis * Sauvignon blanc * Svetambara * terra alba * (Race)

    Verb

    (whit)
  • To make white; to whiten; to bleach.
  • Whited sepulchers, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of uncleanness. — Matthew xxiii. 27.
    So as no fuller on earth can white them. — Mark ix. 3.

    Statistics

    *

    wight

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) . See also (l). The meaning of the wraith-like creature is from barrow-wights in world.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A living creature, especially a human being.
  • * circa 1602 , , act 1, scene 3:
  • O base Hungarian wight ! wilt thou the spigot wield?
  • * 1626 , , verse vi
  • Oh say me true if thou wert mortal wight
    And why from us so quickly thou didst take thy flight.
  • (paganism) A being of one of the Nine Worlds of heathen belief, especially a nature spirit, elf or ancestor.
  • (poetic) A ghost or other supernatural entity.
  • * 1789 , , lines 14-15-16
  • But I saw a glow-worm near,
    Who replied: ‘What wailing wight
    Calls the watchman of the night?
  • (fantasy) A wraith-like creature.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) Merriam-Webster, 1974..

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (archaic except in dialects ) Brave, valorous, strong.
  • *:
  • *:I haue two sones that were but late made knyghtes / and the eldest hyghte sir Tirre // and my yongest sone hyght Lauayne / and yf hit please yow / he shalle ryde with yow vnto that Iustes / and he is of his age x stronge and wyght
  • Strong; stout; active.
  • See also

    * Isle of Wight