Murmured vs Whisper - What's the difference?

murmured | whisper |


As verbs the difference between murmured and whisper

is that murmured is (murmur) while whisper is to speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound.

As a noun whisper is

the act of speaking in a quiet voice, especially, without vibration of the vocal cords.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

murmured

English

Verb

(head)
  • (murmur)

  • murmur

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) Low or indistinct sounds or speech.
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) , chapter V:
  • In the prison of the 'tween decks reigned a darkness pregnant with murmurs . The sentry at the entrance to the hatchway was supposed to "prevent the prisoners from making a noise," but he put a very liberal interpretation upon the clause, and so long as the prisoners refrained from shouting, yelling, and fighting--eccentricities in which they sometimes indulged--he did not disturb them.
    A murmur arose from the audience.
  • * 1960 , , (Jeeves in the Offing) , chapter XI:
  • The moment had come for the honeyed word. I lowered my voice to a confidential murmur , but on her inquiring if I had laryngitis raised it again.
  • (medicine) The sound made by any condition which produces noisy, or turbulent, flow of blood through the heart.
  • A muttered complaint or protest; the expression of dissatisfaction in a low muttering voice; any expression of complaint or discontent
  • * 1919 , :
  • In fear of disease and in the interest of his health man will be muzzled and masked like a vicious dog, and that without any murmur of complaint.
  • * 1960 , , (Jeeves in the Offing) , chapter XX:
  • Glossop will return from his afternoon off to find the awful majesty of the Law waiting for him, complete with handcuffs. We can hardly expect him to accept an exemplary sentence without a murmur , so his first move will be to establish his innocence by revealing all.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , (w) VI:
  • The iewes murmured att itt, because he sayde: I am thatt breed which is come doune from heven.
  • (label) To speak or make low, indistinguishable noise; to mumble, mutter.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=7, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=“Oh yes,” he murmured in a tone of obligatory surprise, as he proceeded to make the kind of 2 which he attributed to Margaret's style of chirography.}}
  • (label) To say (something) indistinctly, to mutter.
  • * (William Shakespeare), 1 , II. 3.51
  • Iheard thee murmur tales of iron wars.

    Derived terms

    * murmuration * murmurer * murmuring * murmurless * murmurous

    Synonyms

    * See aslo

    whisper

    English

    Noun

    (Whispering) (en noun)
  • The act of speaking in a quiet voice, especially, without vibration of the vocal cords.
  • * 1883 , :
  • "Now, look here, Jim Hawkins," he said, in a steady whisper , that was no more than audible.
  • (usually in plural) A rumor.
  • There are whispers of rebellion all around.
  • (figurative) A faint trace or hint (of something).
  • The soup had just a whisper of basil.
  • (internet) A private message to an individual in a chat room.
  • * 2002 , Ralph Schroeder, The Social Life of Avatars (page 218)
  • The invisibility of private interactions in the form of whispers resolved an ethical concern in the research but reduced our ability to gauge the volume of interaction
  • * 2004 , Caroline A. Haythornthwaite, Michelle M. Kazmer, Learning, Culture and Community in Online Education (page 179)
  • Anyone logged in to the chat room can click on an individual name, highlighting it, and send a message — a whisper — that will be seen only by the selected person.

    Derived terms

    * stage whisper * whisper campaign

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound.
  • To mention privately and confidentially, or in a whisper.
  • * Bentley
  • They might buzz and whisper it one to another.
  • To make a low, sibilant sound.
  • * Thomson
  • the hollow, whispering breeze
  • To speak with suspicion or timorous caution; to converse in whispers, as in secret plotting.
  • * Bible, Psalms xli. 7
  • All that hate me whisper together against me.
  • (obsolete) To address in a whisper, or low voice.
  • * Shakespeare
  • and whisper one another in the ear
  • * Keble
  • where gentlest breezes whisper souls distressed
  • (obsolete) To prompt secretly or cautiously; to inform privately.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He came to whisper Wolsey.