Blare vs Whisper - What's the difference?

blare | whisper |


As nouns the difference between blare and whisper

is that blare is (usually singular) a loud sound while whisper is the act of speaking in a quiet voice, especially, without vibration of the vocal cords.

As verbs the difference between blare and whisper

is that blare is to make a loud sound while whisper is to speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound.

blare

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (usually singular) A loud sound.
  • I can hardly hear you over the blare of the radio.
  • *'>citation
  • Dazzling, often garish, brilliance.
  • Verb

  • To make a loud sound.
  • The trumpet blaring in my ears gave me a headache.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 14 , author=Andrew Khan , title=How isolationist is British pop? , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=France, even after 30 years of extraordinary synth, electro and urban pop, is still beaten with a stick marked "Johnny Hallyday" by otherwise sensible journalists. Songs that have taken Europe by storm, from the gloriously bleak Belgian disco of Stromae's Alors on Danse to Sexion d'Assaut's soulful Desole blare from cars everywhere between Lisbon and Lublin but run aground as soon as they hit Dover. }}
  • To cause to sound like the blare of a trumpet; to proclaim loudly.
  • * Tennyson
  • To blare its own interpretation.

    Anagrams

    * * * ----

    whisper

    English

    Noun

    (Whispering) (en noun)
  • The act of speaking in a quiet voice, especially, without vibration of the vocal cords.
  • * 1883 , :
  • "Now, look here, Jim Hawkins," he said, in a steady whisper , that was no more than audible.
  • (usually in plural) A rumor.
  • There are whispers of rebellion all around.
  • (figurative) A faint trace or hint (of something).
  • The soup had just a whisper of basil.
  • (internet) A private message to an individual in a chat room.
  • * 2002 , Ralph Schroeder, The Social Life of Avatars (page 218)
  • The invisibility of private interactions in the form of whispers resolved an ethical concern in the research but reduced our ability to gauge the volume of interaction
  • * 2004 , Caroline A. Haythornthwaite, Michelle M. Kazmer, Learning, Culture and Community in Online Education (page 179)
  • Anyone logged in to the chat room can click on an individual name, highlighting it, and send a message — a whisper — that will be seen only by the selected person.

    Derived terms

    * stage whisper * whisper campaign

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound.
  • To mention privately and confidentially, or in a whisper.
  • * Bentley
  • They might buzz and whisper it one to another.
  • To make a low, sibilant sound.
  • * Thomson
  • the hollow, whispering breeze
  • To speak with suspicion or timorous caution; to converse in whispers, as in secret plotting.
  • * Bible, Psalms xli. 7
  • All that hate me whisper together against me.
  • (obsolete) To address in a whisper, or low voice.
  • * Shakespeare
  • and whisper one another in the ear
  • * Keble
  • where gentlest breezes whisper souls distressed
  • (obsolete) To prompt secretly or cautiously; to inform privately.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He came to whisper Wolsey.