Whether vs Appeal - What's the difference?

whether | appeal |


As a pronoun whether

is (obsolete) which of two.

As a conjunction whether

is (obsolete).

As a verb appeal is

(obsolete) to accuse (someone of something).

As a noun appeal is

(legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reëxamination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver --tomlins --bouvier.

whether

English

Pronoun

(English Pronouns)
  • (obsolete) Which of two.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , Matthew XXVII:
  • The debite answered and sayde unto them: whether of the twayne will ye that I lett loosse unto you?
  • * Bible, Matthew xxi. 31
  • Whether of them twain did the will of his father?

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • (lb)
  • *1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , Mark II:
  • *:whether ys it easyer to saye to the sicke of the palsey, thy synnes ar forgeven the: or to saye, aryse, take uppe thy beed and walke?
  • *1616 , (William Shakespeare), (King John) , I.i:
  • *:Whether hadst thou rather be a Faulconbridge, [...] Or the reputed sonne of Cordelion?
  • .
  • :
  • *
  • *:As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish,I do not suppose that it matters much in reality whether laws are made by dukes or cornerboys, but I like, as far as possible, to associate with gentlemen in private life.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2012, date=June 19, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= England 1-0 Ukraine , passage=The incident immediately revived the debate about goal-line technology, with a final decision on whether it is introduced expected to be taken in Zurich on 5 July.}}
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Old soldiers? , passage=Whether modern, industrial man is less or more warlike than his hunter-gatherer ancestors is impossible to determine. The machine gun is so much more lethal than the bow and arrow that comparisons are meaningless. One thing that is true, though, is that murder rates have fallen over the centuries, as policing has spread and the routine carrying of weapons has diminished.}}
  • ; if, whether or not.
  • :
  • :
  • Usage notes

    * There is some overlap in usage between senses 2 and 3, in that a yes-or-no interrogative content clause can list the two possibilities explicitly in a number of ways:
    Do you know whether he's coming or staying?''
    ''Do you know whether he's coming or not?''
    ''Do you know whether or not he's coming?''
    Further, in the first two of these examples, the "or staying" and "or not" may be added as an afterthought (sometimes indicated in writing with a comma before), such that the ''whether may be uttered in sense 3 and then amended to sense 2. * Sense 4 does not have a counterpart that introduces only a single possibility; *"He's coming, whether you like it" is ungrammatical. * In traditional grammar, the clauses headed by whether'' in senses 2 and 3 are classified as noun clauses, and those headed by ''whether in sense 4 are classified as adverb clauses.

    appeal

    English

    Alternative forms

    * appeale (obsolete) * appeall (obsolete) * appel

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To accuse (someone of something).
  • *, Book VII:
  • *:And there opynly Sir Mador appeled the quene of the deth of hys cousyn Sir Patryse.
  • *1596 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , V.9:
  • *:He gan that Ladie strongly to appele / Of many haynous crymes by her enured.
  • (transitive, legal, chiefly, US) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision.
  • :(Tomlins)
  • *
  • *:For if I be an offender, or have committed any thing worthy of death, I refuse not to die: but if there be none of these things whereof these accuse me, no man may deliver me unto them. I appeal unto Caesar.
  • To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.
  • *(Samuel Horsley) (1733-1806)
  • *:I appeal to the Scriptures in the original.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:They appealed to the sword.
  • To be attractive.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.}}
  • (cricket) To ask an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not, usually by saying "How's that" or "Howzat".
  • To summon; to challenge.
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:Man to man will I appeal the Norman to the lists.
  • To invoke.
  • :(Milton)
  • Derived terms

    * appeal to

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) (a) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review. (b) The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected. (c) The right of appeal. (d) An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public. (e) An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.
  • (Tomlins)
    (Bouvier)
  • A summons to answer to a charge.
  • (John Dryden)
  • A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • a kind of appeal to the Deity, the author of wonders
  • # (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  • Resort to physical means; recourse.
  • The power to attract or interest.
  • Derived terms

    * curb appeal * sex appeal * street appeal

    See also

    * approvement