Next vs When - What's the difference?

next | when |


As adverbs the difference between next and when

is that next is in a time, place or sequence closest or following while when is (interrogative) (used to introduce questions about time).

As nouns the difference between next and when

is that next is the one that follows after this one while when is the time.

As an adjective next

is following in a sequence.

As a determiner next

is the one immediately following the current or most recent one.

As a preposition next

is on the side of; next to.

As a conjunction when is

at what time.

As a pronoun when is

(interrogative) what time; which time.

As an interjection when is

that's enough,.

next

English

Alternative forms

* (l) (dialectal) * (l) (Scotland)

Adjective

(-)
  • Following in a sequence.
  • Being closer to the present location than all other items.
  • * , chapter=8
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=Philander went into the next room, which was just a lean-to hitched on to the end of the shanty, and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.}}
  • Nearest following (of date, time, space or order).
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.}}
  • (figuratively) Following in a hypothetical sequence of some kind.
  • *
  • Antonyms

    * previous * (closest to seven days ahead) last, this

    Determiner

    (en determiner)
  • The one immediately following the current or most recent one
  • Next week would be a good time to meet.
    I'll know better next time.
  • Closest to seven days (one week) in the future.
  • The party is next Tuesday; that is, not this Tuesday, but nine days from now.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • In a time, place or sequence closest or following.
  • They live in the next closest house.
    It's the next best thing to ice cream.
    Next , we stripped off the old paint.
  • On the first subsequent occasion,
  • Financial panic, earthquakes, oil spills, riots. What comes next ?
    When we next meet, you'll be married.

    Antonyms

    * previously

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • On the side of; next to.
  • * 1900 , The Iliad, edited, with apparatus criticus, prolegomena, notes, and appendices , translated by Walter Leaf (London, Macmillan), notes on line 558 of book 2:
  • The fact that the line cannot be original is patent from the fact that Aias in the rest of the Iliad is not encamped next the Athenians .

    Noun

    (-)
  • The one that follows after this one.
  • ''Next , please, don't hold up the queue!

    when

    English

    (wikipedia when)

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (interrogative) (Used to introduce questions about time).
  • When will they arrive ?
  • (Used to introduce indirect questions about time).
  • Do you know when they arrived?
    Do you know when they will arrive?
    Do you know when they arrive?
  • At an earlier and less prosperous time.
  • He's mister high and mighty now, but I remember him when .

    Conjunction

    (missing senses) (English Conjunctions)
  • At what time.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track.
  • *
  • *:Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when , of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  • At such time as.
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , title= Geothermal Energy , volume=101, issue=4, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Energy has seldom been found where we need it when we want it. Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.}}
  • As soon as.
  • :
  • At a time in the past.
  • :
  • *{{quote-news, year=2012, date=April 22, author=Sam Sheringham, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Liverpool 0-1 West Brom , passage=The Baggies had offered little threat until the 28th minute, but when their first chance came it was a clear one.}}

    Derived terms

    * whenwe

    Pronoun

    (English Pronouns)
  • (interrogative) What time; which time
  • Since when do I need your permission?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The time.
  • A good article will cover the who, the what, the when , the where, the why and the how .

    See also

    * since when

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • That's enough,
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Derived terms

    * whenever

    Statistics

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