Come vs When - What's the difference?

come | when |


As a verb come

is to (to consume food).

As an adverb when is

(interrogative) (used to introduce questions about time).

As a conjunction when is

at what time.

As a pronoun when is

(interrogative) what time; which time.

As a noun when is

the time.

As an interjection when is

that's enough,.

come

English

(wikipedia come)

Verb

  • (label) To move from further away to nearer to.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Look, who comes yonder?
  • * (1809-1892)
  • I did not come to curse thee.
  • # To move towards the speaker.
  • # To move towards the listener.
  • # To move towards the object that is the of the sentence.
  • # (label) To move towards the or subject of the main clause.
  • # To move towards an unstated agent.
  • (label) To arrive.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,
  • (label) To appear, to manifest itself.
  • * (1613-1680), (Hudibras)
  • when butter does refuse to come [i.e. to form]
  • (label) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
  • To achieve orgasm; to cum.
  • To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=3 , passage=Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come' to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and ' came very near to saying so.}}
  • To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
  • To become, to turn out to be.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • How come you thus estranged?
  • (label) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
  • (label) To carry through; to succeed in.
  • (label) Happen.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=But out of sight is out of mind. And that
  • To have a social background.
  • # To be or have been a resident or native.
  • # To have been brought up by or employed by.
  • To germinate.
  • Usage notes

    In its general sense, come'' specifically marks motion towards the (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is ''go''. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece of writing. "Millions of people came''' to America from Europe" would be used in an article about America, but "Millions of people ' went to America from Europe" would be used in an article about Europe. When used with adverbs of location, come'' is usually paired with ''here'' or ''hither''. In interrogatives, ''come'' usually indicates a question about source - "Where are you coming from?" - while ''go indicates a question about destination - "Where are you going?" or "Where are you going to?" A few old texts use comen as the past participle. The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase and the collocation "come about". The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan (David Mamet), such as (American Buffalo). Chicago Dialect This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.

    Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    See also

    * cam'st * kingdom come

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
  • * 1869 , RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone , II:
  • “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
  • (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
  • See also

    * cum

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.
    Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.
  • * '>citation
  • Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.

    Usage notes

    * is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation to express annoyance.
  • :
  • An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come , let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  • References

    when

    English

    (wikipedia when)

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (interrogative) (Used to introduce questions about time).
  • When will they arrive ?
  • (Used to introduce indirect questions about time).
  • Do you know when they arrived?
    Do you know when they will arrive?
    Do you know when they arrive?
  • At an earlier and less prosperous time.
  • He's mister high and mighty now, but I remember him when .

    Conjunction

    (missing senses) (English Conjunctions)
  • At what time.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track.
  • *
  • *:Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when , of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  • At such time as.
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , title= Geothermal Energy , volume=101, issue=4, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Energy has seldom been found where we need it when we want it. Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.}}
  • As soon as.
  • :
  • At a time in the past.
  • :
  • *{{quote-news, year=2012, date=April 22, author=Sam Sheringham, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Liverpool 0-1 West Brom , passage=The Baggies had offered little threat until the 28th minute, but when their first chance came it was a clear one.}}

    Derived terms

    * whenwe

    Pronoun

    (English Pronouns)
  • (interrogative) What time; which time
  • Since when do I need your permission?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The time.
  • A good article will cover the who, the what, the when , the where, the why and the how .

    See also

    * since when

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • That's enough,
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Derived terms

    * whenever

    Statistics

    *