What is the difference between wear and tack?

wear | tack |

Wear is an antonym of tack.


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between wear and tack

is that wear is (nautical)  to bring (a sailing vessel) onto the other tack by bringing the wind around the stern (as opposed to tacking when the wind is brought around the bow); to come round on another tack by turning away from the wind while tack is (nautical) to maneuver a sailing vessel so that its bow turns through the wind, ie the wind changes from one side of the vessel to the other.

As verbs the difference between wear and tack

is that wear is {{context|now chiefly|_|uk|_|dialectal|transitive|lang=en}} to guard; watch; keep watch, especially from entry or invasion or wear can be to carry or have equipped on or about one's body, as an item of clothing, equipment, decoration, etc while tack is to nail with a tack (small nail with a flat head).

As nouns the difference between wear and tack

is that wear is (uncountable) (in combination ) clothing (such as footwear) while tack is a small nail with a flat head.

wear

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) weren, werien, from (etyl) .

Alternative forms

* (l), (l) (Scotland)

Verb

  • To guard; watch; keep watch, especially from entry or invasion.
  • To defend; protect.
  • To ward off; prevent from approaching or entering; drive off; repel.
  • to wear the wolf from the sheep
  • To conduct or guide with care or caution, as into a fold or place of safety.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) weren, werien, from (etyl) , (etyl) gwisgo, (etyl) waš- .

    Verb

  • To carry or have equipped on or about one's body, as an item of clothing, equipment, decoration, etc.
  • :
  • *
  • *:It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd's plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=5 citation , passage=‘It's rather like a beautiful Inverness cloak one has inherited. Much too good to hide away, so one wears it instead of an overcoat and pretends it's an amusing new fashion.’}}
  • To have or carry on one's person habitually, consistently; or, to maintain in a particular fashion or manner.
  • :
  • *, chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector's face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.}}
  • To bear or display in one's aspect or appearance.
  • :
  • To overcome one's reluctance and endure a (previously specified) situation.
  • :
  • To eat away at, erode, diminish, or consume gradually; to cause a gradual deterioration in; to produce (some change) through attrition, exposure, or constant use.
  • :
  • (lb) To undergo gradual deterioration; become impaired; be reduced or consumed gradually due to any continued process, activity, or use.
  • :
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:His stock of money began to wear very low.
  • * (1804-1881)
  • *:The familywore out in the earlier part of the century.
  • To exhaust, fatigue, expend, or weary.  His neverending criticism has finally worn' my patience.  Toil and care soon '''wear''' the spirit.  Our physical advantage allowed us to ' wear the other team out
  • (lb) To last or remain durable under hard use or over time; to retain usefulness, value, or desirable qualities under any continued strain or long period of time; sometimes said of a person, regarding the quality of being easy or difficult to tolerate.
  • :
  • (in the phrase "wearing on (someone) ") To cause annoyance, irritation, fatigue, or weariness near the point of an exhaustion of patience.
  • :
  • To pass slowly, gradually or tediously.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Away, I say; time wears .
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Thus wore out night.
  • (lb) To bring (a sailing vessel) onto the other tack by bringing the wind around the stern (as opposed to tacking when the wind is brought around the bow); to come round on another tack by turning away from the wind. Also written "ware". Past: weared, or wore/worn.
  • Derived terms
    * outworn * wear away * wear down * wear off * wear out, worn out, worn-out * wear thin * wear something on one's sleeve, wear one's heart on one's sleeve * wear rose-colored glasses * wearable * wearer * worse for wear
    See also
    * (l) *

    Noun

    (-)
  • (uncountable) (in combination ) clothing
  • footwear'''; outdoor '''wear'''; maternity '''wear
  • (uncountable) damage to the appearance and/or strength of an item caused by use over time
  • * 1895 , H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
  • Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing.
  • (uncountable) fashion
  • * Shakespeare
  • Motley's the only wear .

    tack

    English

    Etymology 1

    From , probably from a (etyl) source.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small nail with a flat head.
  • * 2012 , July 15. Richard Williams in Guardian Unlimited, Tour de France 2012: Carpet tacks cannot force Bradley Wiggins off track
  • A tough test for even the strongest climber, it was new to the Tour de France this year, but its debut will be remembered for the wrong reasons after one of those spectators scattered carpet tacks on the road and induced around 30 punctures among the group of riders including Bradley Wiggins, the Tour's overall leader, and his chief rivals.
  • A thumbtack.
  • (sewing) A loose seam used to temporarily fasten pieces of cloth.
  • (nautical) The lower corner on the leading edge of a sail relative to the direction of the wind.
  • (nautical) A course or heading that enables a sailing vessel to head upwind. See also reach, gybe.
  • A direction or course of action, especially a new one.
  • * 1994 , Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom , Abacus 2010, p. 637:
  • I thought that my refusing Barnard would alienate Botha, and decided that such a tack was too risky.
  • (nautical) The maneuver by which a sailing vessel turns its bow through the wind so that the wind changes from one side to the other.
  • (nautical) The distance a sailing vessel runs between these maneuvers when working to windward; a board.
  • (nautical) A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is close-hauled; also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom.
  • Any of the various equipment and accessories worn by horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. Saddles, stirrups, bridles, halters, reins, bits, harnesses, martingales, and breastplates are all forms of horse tack .
  • (manufacturing, construction, chemistry) The stickiness of a compound, related to its cohesive and adhesive properties.
  • The laminate adhesive has very aggressive tack and is hard to move once in place.
  • Hardtack.
  • * 1913 , D. H. Lawrence, "Sons and Lovers":
  • "But if a woman's got nothing but her fair fame to feed on, why, it's thin tack , and a donkey would die of it!"
  • That which is attached; a supplement; an appendix.
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • Some tacks had been made to money bills in King Charles's time.
    (Macaulay)
  • (legal, Scotland) A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease.
  • (Burrill)
  • (obsolete) Confidence; reliance.
  • (Halliwell)
    Synonyms
    * (nautical maneuver) coming about
    Hyponyms
    * (nail-like object for affixing thin things) thumbtack
    Derived terms
    * Blu-Tack * hardtack * thumbtack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To nail with a tack (small nail with a flat head).
  • To sew/stich with a tack (loose seam used to temporarily fasten pieces of cloth).
  • (nautical) To maneuver a sailing vessel so that its bow turns through the wind, i.e. the wind changes from one side of the vessel to the other.
  • To add something as an extra item.
  • to tack (something) onto (something)
  • Often paired with "up", to place the tack on a horse.
  • Synonyms
    * to change tack
    Antonyms
    * to wear

    See also

    * * Blu-Tack

    Etymology 2

    From an old or dialectal form of (etyl) tache. See techy.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A stain; a tache.
  • (obsolete) A peculiar flavour or taint.
  • (Drayton)
    ----