You vs Weak - What's the difference?

you | weak |


As an adjective weak is

lacking in force (usually strength) or ability.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

you

English

Alternative forms

* ye * ya, yah, yer, yeh, y', yo, yu (informal or eye dialect) * -cha * -ja * u * yoo (eye dialect) * yew * youe, yow, yowe (obsolete)

Pronoun

  • (object pronoun) The people spoken, or written to, as an object.
  • * 1611 , Bible , Authorized (King James) Version. Genesis XLII:
  • And Joseph said unto them, That is it that I spake unto you , saying, Ye are spies [...].
  • * (William Shakespeare), Richard III :
  • If I may counsaile you, some day or two / Your Highnesse shall repose you at the Tower [...].
  • * 1611 , Bible , Authorized (King James) Version. Genesis XIX:
  • And Lot went out, and spake unto his sons in law, which married his daughters, and said, Up, get you out of this place; for the LORD will destroy this city.
  • * 1975 , Joseph Nazel, Death for Hire :
  • You'd better get you a gun and kill him before he kills you or somebody.
  • (object pronoun) The person spoken to or written to, as an object. (Replacing thee; originally as a mark of respect.)
  • * (Thomas Malory), Le Morte Darthur , Book VIII:
  • I charge you , as ye woll have my love, that ye warne your kynnesmen that ye woll beare that day the slyve of golde uppon your helmet.
  • (subject pronoun) The people spoken to or written to, as a subject. (Replacing ye.)
  • Both of you should get ready now.
    You are all supposed to do as I tell you.
  • (subject pronoun) The person spoken to or written to, as a subject. (Originally as a mark of respect.)
  • * (Geoffrey Chaucer), "The Clerk's Tale", Canterbury Tales , Ellesmere manuscript (c. 1410):
  • certes lord / so wel vs liketh yow / And al youre werk / and euere han doon / þat we / Ne koude nat vs self deuysen how / We myghte lyuen / in moore felicitee [...].
  • * 1814 , (Jane Austen), Mansfield Park :
  • You' are right, Fanny, to protest against such an office, but ' you need not be afraid.
  • (indefinite personal pronoun) Anyone, one; an unspecified individual or group of individuals (as subject or object).
  • * 2001 , Polly Vernon, The Guardian , 5 May 2001:
  • You' can't choose your family, your lovers are difficult and volatile, but, oh, ' you can choose your friends - so doesn't it make much more sense to live and holiday with them instead?

    Usage notes

    * Originally, , respectively.) * In some forms of English, are all but nonexistent. * Although , or youse (though not all of these are completely equivalent or considered Standard English). * The pronoun is usually omitted in imperative sentences, but need not be. In affirmative imperatives, it may be included before the verb (You go right ahead''; ''You stay out of it''); in negative imperatives, it may be included either before the ''don't'', or, more commonly, after it (''Don't you dare go in there''; ''Don't you start now ). * See for other personal pronouns.

    Synonyms

    * *: thou *: ye *: yer (UK eye dialect) * *: all of you (plural) *: you all *: you + number *: ye *: yous/youse *: y'all, all y'all (Southern US) *: ya'll (AAVE) *: you-uns (Midwestern US and Appalachia) *: yinz *: you guys/you gals *: you lot (UK) *: allyou (Caribbean) *: yer (UK eye dialect) * , ye, to you, to thee, to ye * ye, to you, to ye, to you all * (one) one, people, they, them

    Derived terms

    * you're

    Determiner

    (en determiner)
  • The individual or group spoken or written to.
  • Have you gentlemen come to see the lady who fell backwards off a bus?
  • Used before epithets for emphasis.
  • You idiot!

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To address (a person) using the pronoun you'', rather than ''thou .
  • weak

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Lacking in force (usually strength) or ability.
  • * Shakespeare
  • a poor, infirm, weak , and despised old man
  • * Dryden
  • weak with hunger, mad with love
  • Unable to sustain a great weight, pressure, or strain.
  • a weak''' timber; a '''weak rope
  • Unable to withstand temptation, urgency, persuasion, etc.; easily impressed, moved, or overcome; accessible; vulnerable.
  • weak''' resolutions; '''weak virtue
  • * Joseph Addison, The Fair Petinent Act I, scene I:
  • Guard thy heart / On this weak side, where most our nature fails.
  • Dilute, lacking in taste or potency.
  • *
  • , title=The Mirror and the Lamp , chapter=2 citation , passage=That the young Mr. Churchills liked—but they did not like him coming round of an evening and drinking weak whisky-and-water while he held forth on railway debentures and corporation loans. Mr. Barrett, however, by fawning and flattery, seemed to be able to make not only Mrs. Churchill but everyone else do what he desired.}}
  • (grammar) Displaying a particular kind of inflection, including:
  • # (Germanic languages, of verbs) Regular in inflection, lacking vowel changes and having a past tense with -d- or -t-.
  • # (Germanic languages, of nouns) Showing less distinct grammatical endings.
  • # (Germanic languages, of adjectives) Definite in meaning, often used with a definite article or similar word.
  • (physics) One of the four fundamental forces associated with nuclear decay.
  • (slang) Bad or uncool.
  • (mathematics, logic) Having a narrow range of logical consequences; narrowly applicable. (Often contrasted with a statement which implies it.)
  • Resulting from, or indicating, lack of judgment, discernment, or firmness; unwise; hence, foolish.
  • * Milton
  • If evil thence ensue, / She first his weak indulgence will accuse.
  • Not having power to convince; not supported by force of reason or truth; unsustained.
  • The prosecution advanced a weak case.
  • * Milton
  • convinced of his weak arguing
  • Lacking in vigour or expression.
  • a weak''' sentence; a '''weak style
  • Not prevalent or effective, or not felt to be prevalent; not potent; feeble.
  • * Shakespeare
  • weak prayers
  • (stock exchange) Tending towards lower prices.
  • a weak market

    Synonyms

    * (lacking in force or ability) feeble, frail, powerless, vincible, assailable ,vulnerable * (lacking in taste or potency) dilute, watery * See also

    Antonyms

    * (lacking in force or ability) healthy, powerful, robust, strong, invincible * (lacking in taste or potency) potent, robust, strong

    Derived terms

    * weaken * weakling * weakness * weak sister

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----