Wany vs Wavy - What's the difference?

wany | wavy |


As adjectives the difference between wany and wavy

is that wany is waning or diminished in some parts; not of uniform size throughout; said especially of sawed boards or timber cut too near the outside of the log while wavy is rising or swelling in waves.

As a noun wavy is

(goose).

wany

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Waning or diminished in some parts; not of uniform size throughout; said especially of sawed boards or timber cut too near the outside of the log.
  • Spoiled by wet; said of timber.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Webster 1913)

    wavy

    English

    Etymology 1

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Rising or swelling in waves.
  • Full of waves.
  • Moving to and fro; undulating.
  • Having wave-like shapes on its border or surface; waved.
  • (botany, of a margin) Moving up and down relative to the surface; undulate.
  • (heraldry) , in a wavy line; applied to ordinaries, or division lines.
  • Etymology 2

    See wavey .

    Noun

    (wavies)
  • (goose).
  • * 1862 , in The Zoologist: a popular miscellany of natural history , volume 20, page 7835:
  • According to Indian report, a great breeding-ground for the blue wavy is the country lying in the interior of the north-east point of Labrador, Cape Dudley Digges.
  • * 1888 , in the Journals of the Senate of Canada , volume 22, Appendix 1, page 237:
  • The blue and white wavies breed in the barren grounds and feed chiefly on berries.