Waler vs Water - What's the difference?

waler | water |


As nouns the difference between waler and water

is that waler is (australia|india) a breed of light saddle horse from australia, once favoured as a warhorse or waler can be (structural engineering) a plank of wood, block of concrete, etc, used for support or to maintain required separation between components in order to help maintain the form of a construction under stress while water is (uncountable) a chemical, found at room temperature and pressure as a clear liquid, having the formula h₂o, required by all forms of life on earth.

As a verb water is

to pour water into the soil surrounding (plants).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

waler

English

(Waler horse)

Etymology 1

From , the horse having been bred in the then colony of New South Wales in the 19th century.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (Australia, India) A breed of light saddle horse from Australia, once favoured as a warhorse.
  • * 1888 , Rudyard Kipling, ‘Wressley of the Foreign Office’, Plain Tales from the Hills , Folio Society 2004, p. 204,
  • Without reason, against prudence, and at a moment's notice, he fell in love with a frivolous, golden-haired girl who used to tear about Simla Mall on a high, rough waler , with a blue velvet jockey-cap crammed over her eyes.
  • * 1889 , Annie Brassey, The Last Voyage, to India and Australia, in the ‘Sunbeam’ , 2010, page 46,
  • There were Arabs of high degree, thoroughbred English horses, and very good-looking Walers among them, besides some tiny ponies, four of which, when harnessed together, drew a real Cinderella coach of solid silver.
  • * 2007', "'''Waler ", entry in Bonnie L. Hendricks, ''International Encyclopedia of Horse Breeds , page 434,
  • Some maintain that the Waler is extinct, its blood living on only in the modern Australian Stock Horse and some of the feral brumbies that roam the outback.
  • * 2013 , Peter Macinnis, The Big Book of Australian History , page 134,
  • By the 1850s, there was a thriving trade in selling the horses to the Indian Army as 'remounts'. Between 1834 and 1937, more than 300,000 Walers were sent to India.
    Usage notes
    Formerly considered a horse type, rather than a distinct breed.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

  • (structural engineering) A plank of wood, block of concrete, etc., used for support or to maintain required separation between components in order to help maintain the form of a construction under stress.
  • * 1998 , Richard Lampo, Thomas Nosker, Doug Barno, John Busel, Ali Maher, Piyush Dutta, Robert Odello, Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) Program: Development and Demonstration of Composite FRP Fender, Loadbearing, and Sheet Piling Systems , US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories, USACERL Technical Report 98/123, page 65,
  • Another consideration is when walers' are placed between the piles (Figure 27) and to what extent the pile could deform before the load of the berthing vessel would be shared by the adjacent ' walers .
  • * 2007 , David Easton, The Rammed Earth House , page 121,
  • Backing for the plywood is provided by 2” × 12” wooden planks (walers''''' in forming technology) spaced approximately 15 inches apart in the vertical direction and running the full length of the wall section. The form ties are ¾-inch pipe clamps, spaced 6 to 10 feet apart in the horizontal direction. In the typical concrete forms, '''walers''' are 2×4's and form ties are spaced at 2-foot intervals. By using 2×12 ' walers , form ties can be spaced at up to 10-foot intervals.
  • * 2009 , Howard A. Perko, Helical Piles: A Practical Guide to Design and Installation , page 374,
  • An optional cast-in-place concrete waler' is shown at each anchor row location. The concrete '''walers''' are cast against the earth after installation of the helical anchors and prior to excavation for the next lift. Concrete '''walers''' can reduce the required thickness of shotcrete for the remaining facing. The ' walers also improve punching resistance at the helical tie back locations.

    Anagrams

    *

    water

    Noun

  • (uncountable) A chemical, found at room temperature and pressure as a clear liquid, having the formula H?O, required by all forms of life on Earth.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= In the News , passage=Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.}}
  • # (uncountable, in particular) The liquid form of this chemical; liquid H?O.
  • #* 1835 , Sir , Sir (James Clark Ross), Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Volume 1 , pp.284-5
  • Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  • #* 2002 , Arthur T. Hubbard, Encyclopedia of Surface and Colloid Science (ISBN 0824707966), page 4895:
  • A water' drop placed on the surface of ice can either spread or form a lens depending on the properties of the three phases involved in wetting, i.e., on the properties of the ice, ' water , and gas phases.
  • #* {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The climate of Tibet: Pole-land , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
  • # (countable) A serving of water.
  • #*
  • (obsolete) Ancient philosophy.
  • # (alchemy) One of the four basic elements.
  • # One of the five basic elements (see ).
  • (often, in the plural) Any body of water, or a specific part of it.
  • *
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage='Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.}}
  • A combination of water and other substance(s).
  • # (sometimes, countable) Mineral water.
  • # (countable, often, in the plural) Spa water.
  • # (pharmacy) A solution in water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance.
  • # Urine.
  • #*
  • # Amniotic fluid; used in the plural in the UK and in singular in North America.
  • (UK)
  • (North America)
  • # (colloquial, medicine) Fluids in the body, especially when causing swelling.
  • (figuratively, in the plural, or, in the singular) A state of affairs; conditions; usually with an adjective indicating an adverse condition.
  • (colloquial, figuratively) A person's intuition.
  • (uncountable, dated, finance) Excess valuation of securities.
  • *
  • *
  • The limpidity and lustre of a precious stone, especially a diamond.
  • A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted to linen, silk, metals, etc.
  • Synonyms

    * See also * See also

    Antonyms

    * ice, steam, water vapor/water vapour * (basic elements) earth, air/wind, fire; wood, metal; void/ether

    Hypernyms

    * chemical, substance * liquid, fluid * (basic elements) element * (urine) body fluid, bodily fluid, biofluid

    Hyponyms

    * heavy water; ice, steam, water vapor/water vapour * mineral water; hard water, soft water

    Meronyms

    * hydrogen, oxygen

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Descendants

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To pour water into the soil surrounding (plants).
  • *
  • To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate.
  • * Milton
  • tears watering the ground
  • * Longfellow
  • Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water the woodlands.
  • To provide (animals) with water for drinking.
  • I need to go water the cattle .
  • To get or take in water.
  • The ship put into port to water .
  • (colloquial) To urinate onto.
  • Nature called, so I stepped into the woods and watered a tree.
  • To dilute.
  • Can you water the whisky, please?
  • (transitive, dated, finance) To overvalue (securities), especially through deceptive accounting.
  • *
  • To fill with or secrete water.
  • Chopping onions makes my eyes water .
    The smell of fried onions makes my mouth water .
  • To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines.
  • to water silk

    Synonyms

    * (urinate) (see the list of synonyms in the entry "urinate") * (dilute) water down

    Antonyms

    * (dilute) refine

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    *