Mother vs Water - What's the difference?

mother | water |


As a proper noun mother

is one's mother.

As a noun water is

(uncountable) a chemical, found at room temperature and pressure as a clear liquid, having the formula h₂o, required by all forms of life on earth.

As a verb water is

to pour water into the soil surrounding (plants).

mother

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A (human) female who (a) s a child (b) gives birth to a baby (c) donates a fertilized egg or (d) donates a body cell which has resulted in a clone. Sometimes used in reference to a pregnant female, possibly as a shortened form of mother-to-be.
  • I am visiting my mother'''(a) today.'' — ''My sister-in-law has just become a '''mother'''.(b)'' — ''Nutrients and oxygen obtained by the '''mother (c) are conveyed to the fetus.
  • * 1988 , Robert Ferro, Second Son ,
  • He had something of his mother in him, but this was because he realized that in the end only her love was unconditional, and in gratitude he had emulated her.
  • * 1991 , (Susan Faludi), The Undeclared War Against American Women ,
  • The antiabortion iconography in the last decade featured the fetus but never the mother .
  • A female parent of an animal.
  • The lioness was a mother of four cubs.
  • (figuratively) A female ancestor.
  • * 1525 , ,
  • And Ada[Adam] called his wyfe Heua[Eve] because she was the mother of all that lyveth
  • * 1844 , , Fragment on the Church , Volume 1, page 17,
  • But one in the place of God and not God, is as it were a falsehood; it is the mother falsehood from which all idolatry is derived.
  • (figuratively) A source or origin.
  • The Mediterranean was mother to many cultures and languages.
  • * 1606', '', Act 4, Scene 3, '''1866 , George Steevens (editor), ''The Complete Works of William Shakespeare , page 278,
  • Alas, poor country: / Almost afraid to know itself! It cannot / Be call'd our mother , but our grave:
  • * 1844 , , Fragment on the Church , Volume 1, page 17,
  • But one in the place of God and not God, is as it were a falsehood; it is the mother falsehood from which all idolatry is derived.
  • (when followed by a surname) A title of respect for one's mother-in-law.
  • Mother Smith, meet my cousin, Doug Jones.
  • (figuratively) Any elderly woman, especially within a particular community.
  • (figuratively) Any person or entity which performs mothering.
  • * The inhabitants of the villages ceased, they ceased in Israel, until that I Deborah arose, that I arose a mother in Israel. –Judges 5:7, KJV.
  • * Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. –Galatians 4:26, KJV.
  • A film or membrane which is developed on the surface of fermented alcoholic liquids, such as vinegar, wine, etc., and acts as a means of conveying the oxygen of the air to the alcohol and other combustible principles of the liquid, thus leading to their oxidation.
  • The principal piece of an astrolabe, into which the others are fixed.
  • The female superior or head of a religious house; an abbess, etc.
  • (obsolete) Hysterical passion; hysteria.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Synonyms
    * See also * metro-
    Antonyms
    * (with regards to gender) father * (with regards to ancestry) daughter, son, child
    Hypernyms
    * (a female parent) parent
    Coordinate terms
    * (a female parent) father
    Derived terms
    * antimother * be mother * biological mother * birth mother * foster mother * grandmother, great-grandmother * Mother City * Mother Earth * motherfucker * Mothering Sunday * mother-in-law * motherland * motherload * mother lode * Mother's Day * mother-to-be * mother wit * motherwort * refrigerator mother * stepmother * surrogate mother

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To treat as a mother would be expected to treat her child; to nurture.
  • *
  • She had seen fewer years than any of us, but she was of such superb Evehood and simplicity that she mothered us from the beginning.

    References

    * American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company 2003.

    Etymology 2

    Calque of Arabic .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something that is the greatest or most significant of its kind.
  • "The great duel, the mother of all battles has begun." — (Saddam Hussein)

    Etymology 3

    Shortened from (motherfucker)

    Alternative forms

    * mutha

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (euphemistic, coarse, slang) Motherfucker.
  • (euphemistic, colloquial) A striking example.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * MF, mofo, motherfucker, mutha

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 4

    Coined from .

    Alternative forms

    * moth-er

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nonstandard) A cat that catches moths.
  • Usage notes
    Because of the spelling (mother), the alternative hyphenated spelling (moth-er) may be used to avoid ambiguity. 100 English basic words 1000 English basic words

    water

    Noun

  • (uncountable) A chemical, found at room temperature and pressure as a clear liquid, having the formula H?O, required by all forms of life on Earth.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= In the News , passage=Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.}}
  • # (uncountable, in particular) The liquid form of this chemical; liquid H?O.
  • #* 1835 , Sir , Sir (James Clark Ross), Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Volume 1 , pp.284-5
  • Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  • #* 2002 , Arthur T. Hubbard, Encyclopedia of Surface and Colloid Science (ISBN 0824707966), page 4895:
  • A water' drop placed on the surface of ice can either spread or form a lens depending on the properties of the three phases involved in wetting, i.e., on the properties of the ice, ' water , and gas phases.
  • #* {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The climate of Tibet: Pole-land , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
  • # (countable) A serving of water.
  • #*
  • (obsolete) Ancient philosophy.
  • # (alchemy) One of the four basic elements.
  • # One of the five basic elements (see ).
  • (often, in the plural) Any body of water, or a specific part of it.
  • *
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage='Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.}}
  • A combination of water and other substance(s).
  • # (sometimes, countable) Mineral water.
  • # (countable, often, in the plural) Spa water.
  • # (pharmacy) A solution in water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance.
  • # Urine.
  • #*
  • # Amniotic fluid; used in the plural in the UK and in singular in North America.
  • (UK)
  • (North America)
  • # (colloquial, medicine) Fluids in the body, especially when causing swelling.
  • (figuratively, in the plural, or, in the singular) A state of affairs; conditions; usually with an adjective indicating an adverse condition.
  • (colloquial, figuratively) A person's intuition.
  • (uncountable, dated, finance) Excess valuation of securities.
  • *
  • *
  • The limpidity and lustre of a precious stone, especially a diamond.
  • A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted to linen, silk, metals, etc.
  • Synonyms

    * See also * See also

    Antonyms

    * ice, steam, water vapor/water vapour * (basic elements) earth, air/wind, fire; wood, metal; void/ether

    Hypernyms

    * chemical, substance * liquid, fluid * (basic elements) element * (urine) body fluid, bodily fluid, biofluid

    Hyponyms

    * heavy water; ice, steam, water vapor/water vapour * mineral water; hard water, soft water

    Meronyms

    * hydrogen, oxygen

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Descendants

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To pour water into the soil surrounding (plants).
  • *
  • To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate.
  • * Milton
  • tears watering the ground
  • * Longfellow
  • Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water the woodlands.
  • To provide (animals) with water for drinking.
  • I need to go water the cattle .
  • To get or take in water.
  • The ship put into port to water .
  • (colloquial) To urinate onto.
  • Nature called, so I stepped into the woods and watered a tree.
  • To dilute.
  • Can you water the whisky, please?
  • (transitive, dated, finance) To overvalue (securities), especially through deceptive accounting.
  • *
  • To fill with or secrete water.
  • Chopping onions makes my eyes water .
    The smell of fried onions makes my mouth water .
  • To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines.
  • to water silk

    Synonyms

    * (urinate) (see the list of synonyms in the entry "urinate") * (dilute) water down

    Antonyms

    * (dilute) refine

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

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