Waiter vs Waster - What's the difference?

waiter | waster |


As nouns the difference between waiter and waster

is that waiter is a male or sometimes female attendant who or similar while waster is someone or something that wastes; someone who squanders or spends extravagantly or waster can be (obsolete|chiefly|fencing) a kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

waiter

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A male or sometimes female attendant who or similar.
  • * , title=The Mirror and the Lamp
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace, […]; and the way she laughed, cackling like a hen, the way she talked to the waiters and the maid, […]—all these unexpected phenomena impelled one to hysterical mirth, and made one class her with such immortally ludicrous types as Ally Sloper, the Widow Twankey, or Miss Moucher.}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=5 citation , passage=A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed.
      ‘Civilized,’ he said to Mr. Campion. ‘Humanizing.’ […] ‘Cigars and summer days and women in big hats with swansdown face-powder, that's what it reminds me of.’}}
  • (literally) Someone who waits for somebody or something; a person who is waiting.
  • (obsolete) A vessel or tray on which something is carried, as dishes, etc.; a salver.
  • Derived terms

    * landwaiter * tide waiter

    See also

    * barista * bartender * * server

    References

    waster

    English

    Etymology 1

    Partly from (etyl) wastere, wastour, partly from .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Someone or something that wastes; someone who squanders or spends extravagantly.
  • (dialectal) An imperfection in the wick of a candle, causing it to waste.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * time-waster

    Etymology 2

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, chiefly, fencing) A kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.
  • *, II.3.6:
  • Or, as they that play at wasters exercise themselves by a few cudgels how to avoid an enemy's blows, let us arm ourselves against all such violent incursions which may invade our minds.

    Anagrams

    * English agent nouns ----