Slag vs Waste - What's the difference?

slag | waste |


As a noun slag

is whipped cream or slag can be apoplexy.

As a verb waste is

.

slag

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Waste material from a coal mine.
  • * 2011 , Vivienne Dockerty, A Woman Undefeated , page 54,
  • After the big village, the scenery had returned to grass and woodland, but this had now given way to ugly mounds of discarded slag'. Beyond the ' slag was a colliery with its machinery and smoking chimney, making the whole area look grim and austere.
  • Scum that forms on the surface of molten metal.
  • * 2006 , Melisa W. Lai, Michele Burns Ewald, Chapter 95: Silver'', Martin J. Wonsiewicz, Karen G. Edmonson, Peter J. Boyle (editors), ''Goldfrank?s Toxicologic Emergencies , 8th Edition, page 1358,
  • In Asia Minor and on islands in the Aegean Sea, dumps of slag (scum formed by molten metal surface oxidation) demonstrate that silver was being separated from lead as early as 5000 BC.
  • * 2009 , , Monongahela Dusk , page 255,
  • He leans out over the track and skims slag off the top of the boiling steel, risking what is called “catching a flyer,” which occurs when hot metal explodes out of the mold, spraying everyone in the vicinity.
  • Impurities]] formed and separated out when a metal is smelted from ore; [[vitrify, vitrified cinders.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=
  • , title=Internal Combustion , chapter=2 citation , passage=Buried within the Mediterranean littoral are some seventy to ninety million tons of slag from ancient smelting, about a third of it concentrated in Iberia. This ceaseless industrial fueling caused the deforestation of an estimated fifty to seventy million acres of woodlands.}}
  • * 2008 , Barbara S. Ottaway, Ben Roberts, The Emergence of Metalworking'', Andrew Jones (editor), ''Prehistoric Europe: Theory and Practice , page 207,
  • Consequently, mounds of large ‘cakes’ of slag are often found near the smelting sites of the Late Bronze Age, as for example at Ramsau in Austria (Doonan et al. 1996).
  • Hard aggregate remaining as a residue from blast furnaces, sometimes used as a surfacing material.
  • * 2006 , Jan R. Prusinski, 44: Slag as a Cementitious Material'', Joseph F. Lamond, James H. Pielert (editors), ''Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials , page 517,
  • During blast furnace operations, the plant operator pays careful attention to the slag chemistry (both composition and variability) as slag behavior is a major consideration in ensuring the quality of hot metal (molten iron).
  • * 2010 , Yuri N. Toulouevski, Ilyaz Y. Zinurov, Innovation in Electric Arc Furnaces , Springer, page 16,
  • All these properties are determined by slag' composition and its temperature. In basic ' slags , foaming ability increases as SiO2 concentration grows.
  • Scoria associated with a volcano.
  • (UK, pejorative, dated) A coward.
  • (UK, pejorative) A contemptible person, a scumbag.
  • * 1996 , '', Scene 8, 2001, ''Sarah Kane: Complete Plays , page 100,
  • Kill him. Kill the royal slag .
  • (UK, pejorative) A prostitute.
  • * 1984 , , Heart of Oak , 1997, paperback edition, page 260,
  • We never talked about that, of course; we talked about how we could find a woman in the Dilly, and if the Yanks had taken them all, how we could always resort to the peroxided older slags who hung out around the side doors to Waterloo station and did knee tremblers for the Yanks.
  • (UK, Australia, New Zealand, slang, pejorative) A woman (sometimes a man) who has loose morals relating to sex; a slut.
  • * 2002 , , The Woman Who Left , 2012, ebook, unnumbered page,
  • Slag ! Wait till I tell Jacob what we?ve been doing – and I will, you mark my words! He?ll want nowt to do with you then, will he, eh? He?ll see you for what you really are. A cheap and nasty little bitch!’
  • * 2008 , Ashley Lister, Swingers - Female Confidential , page 31,
  • ‘He was a lovely man but, when I told him I wanted to continue swinging, he freaked out and called me a slag .’

    Synonyms

    * (impurities from a metal) dross, recrement, scoria * (woman with loose sexual morals) see

    Derived terms

    * slag-bag * slaggy * slag heap

    See also

    * clinker

    Verb

  • To produce slag.
  • To talk badly about; to malign or denigrate (someone).
  • * 2010 , Courtenay Young, Help Yourself Towards Mental Health , page 344,
  • If you slag' off the other person, then—to the extent that your child identifies with that person as their parent—you are ' slagging off a part of them.
  • (intransitive, Australia, slang) To spit.
  • Derived terms

    * slag about * slag off * slagging rag

    References

    * *

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    waste

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

  • A waste land; an uninhabited desolate region; a wilderness or desert.
  • A place that has been laid waste or destroyed.
  • A large tract of uncultivated land.
  • A vast expanse of water.
  • A disused mine or part of one.
  • The action or progress of wasting; extravagant consumption or ineffectual use.
  • That was a waste of time
    Her life seemed a waste
  • Large abundance of something, specifically without it being used.
  • Gradual loss or decay.
  • A decaying of the body by disease; wasting away.
  • (rare) Destruction or devastation caused by war or natural disasters; See "to lay waste"
  • Excess of material, useless by-products or damaged, unsaleable products; garbage; rubbish.
  • Excrement
  • The cage was littered with animal waste
  • (legal) A cause of action which may be brought by the owner of a future interest in property against the current owner of that property to prevent the current owner from degrading the value or character of the property, either intentionally or through neglect.
  • Derived terms
    * ameliorative waste * cotton waste * industrial waste * lay waste * nuclear waste * permissive waste * radioactive waste * rock waste * silk waste * toxic waste * trade waste * voluntary waste * wasteful * wasteless * waste of space * waste of time * waste pipe * wasty

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Uncultivated, uninhabited.
  • *:
  • *:SOo whanne syr Galahad was departed from the castel of maydens / he rode tyl he came to a waste forest / & there he mette with syre launcelot and syr Percyuale but they knewe hym not / for he was newe desguysed / Ryghte so syr launcelot his fader dressid his spere and brake it vpon syr Galahad
  • Barren; desert.
  • *2009 , (Diarmaid MacCulloch), A History of Christianity , Penguin 2010, p. 255:
  • *:For centuries the shrine at Mecca had been of merely local importance, far outshone by the Temple of the Jews in Jerusalem, whose cult Christians had in good measure renewed by their pilgrimage in honour of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection, while leaving the actual site of the Jerusalem Temple dishonoured and waste .
  • Rejected as being defective; eliminated as being worthless; produced in excess.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= In the News , passage=Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.}}
  • Superfluous; needless.
  • Dismal; gloomy; cheerless.
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:His heart became appalled as he gazed forward into the waste darkness of futurity.
  • Unfortunate; disappointing. (rfex)
  • Usage notes
    Same meanings as wasted.
    Derived terms
    * affirmative waste * ameliorative waste * go to waste * lay waste * lie waste * nonwasted * nonwasting * permissive waste * run to waste * unwasted * voluntary waste * waste pipe * wasteland * wasteness * wastrife

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (wast)
  • To devastate or destroy.
  • * Spenser
  • Thou barren ground, whom winter's wrath hath wasted , / Art made a mirror to behold my plight.
  • * Dryden
  • The Tiber / Insults our walls, and wastes our fruitful grounds.
  • To wear away by degrees; to impair gradually; to diminish by constant loss; to use up; to consume; to spend; to wear out.
  • * Bible, Numbers xiv. 33
  • until your carcasses be wasted in the wilderness
  • * Robertson
  • Wasted by such a course of life, the infirmities of age daily grew on him.
  • To squander (money or resources) uselessly; to spend (time) idly.
  • * Gray
  • Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, / And waste its sweetness on the desert air.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=13 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) , title= Ideas coming down the track , passage=A “moving platform” scheme
    E. Kay (1822-1897), afterwards Lord Justice of Appeal, had rooms on the same staircase as myself, and we wasted a great deal of time together, both in term and in my second summer vacation.'' 1909. Francis Galton, ''Memories of my life , p. 69.
  • (slang) To .
  • Gradually lose weight, weaken, become frail.
  • To be diminished; to lose bulk, substance, strength, value etc. gradually.
  • * Bible, 1 Kings xvii. 14
  • The barrel of meal shall not waste .
  • (legal) To damage, impair, or injure (an estate, etc.) voluntarily, or by allowing the buildings, fences, etc., to fall into decay.
  • Derived terms
    * get wasted * wastage * waste breath * waster * waste time * wastingly * wastery * wastethrift * wastrel * wasty

    See also

    *

    Anagrams

    * * * 1000 English basic words ----