Warps vs Warns - What's the difference?

warps | warns |


As verbs the difference between warps and warns

is that warps is (warp) while warns is (warn).

warps

English

Verb

(head)
  • (warp)
  • Anagrams

    *

    warp

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) warp, werp, from (etyl) wearp, . Cognate with (etyl) warp, (etyl) warp, (etyl) Warf, (etyl) varp, (etyl) varp.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A throw; a cast.
  • (dialectal) A cast of fish (herring, haddock, etc.); four, as a tale of counting fish.
  • (dialectal) The young of an animal when brought forth prematurely; a cast lamb, kid, calf, or foal.
  • The sediment which subsides from turbid water; the alluvial deposit of muddy water artificially introduced into low lands in order to enrich or fertilise them.
  • (uncountable) The state of being bent or twisted out of shape.
  • A cast or twist; a distortion or twist, such as in a piece of wood.
  • (weaving) The threads that run lengthwise in a woven fabric; crossed by the woof or weft.
  • (nautical) A line or cable used in warping a ship.
  • A theoretical construct that permits travel across a medium without passing through it normally, such as a teleporter or time warp.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) werpen, weorpen, worpen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (transitive, obsolete, outside, dialects) To throw; cast; toss; hurl; fling.
  • (transitive, obsolete, outside, dialects) To utter; ejaculate; enunciate; give utterance to.
  • (dialectal) To bring forth (young) prematurely, said of cattle, sheep, horses, etc.
  • (dialectal) To cause a person to suddenly come into a particular state; throw.
  • (transitive, dialectal, of the wind or sea) To toss or throw around; carry along by natural force.
  • (ambitransitive, dialectal, of a door) To throw open; open wide.
  • To twist or turn something out of shape.
  • * Coleridge
  • The planks looked warped .
  • * Tennyson
  • Walter warped his mouth at this / To something so mock solemn, that I laughed.
  • * , chapter=16
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The preposterous altruism too!
  • To deflect something from a true or proper course.
  • * Dryden
  • This first avowed, nor folly warped my mind.
  • * Addison
  • I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy.
  • * Southey
  • We are divested of all those passions which cloud the intellects, and warp the understandings, of men.
  • To become twisted out of shape.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • One of you will prove a shrunk panel, and, like green timber, warp .
  • * Moxon
  • They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting, or warping .
  • To go astray or be deflected from a correct course
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • There is our commission, / From which we would not have you warp .
  • To affect something wrongly, unfairly or unfavourably; to bias
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=June 3, author=Nathan Rabin
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Mr. Plow” (season 4, episode 9; originally aired 11/19/1992) , passage=It gives a pair of drunken bums direction, purpose and thriving small businesses but it destroys their friendship and warps their morals in the process.}}
  • To arrange strands of thread etc so that they run lengthwise in weaving
  • (obsolete, rare, poetic) To weave, hence (figuratively) to fabricate; plot.
  • * Sternhold
  • while doth he mischief warp
    (Nares)
  • (nautical) To move a vessel by hauling on a line or cable that is fastened to an anchor or pier; especially to move a sailing ship through a restricted place such as a harbour
  • * 1883: (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island)
  • We had a dreary morning's work before us, for there was no sign of any wind, and the boats had to be got out and manned, and the ship warped three or four miles around the corner of the island.
  • (nautical) (for a ship) To be moved by warping.
  • To fly with a bending or waving motion, like a flock of birds or insects.
  • * (John Milton)
  • A pitchy cloud / Of locusts, warping on the eastern wind.
  • (agriculture) To let the tide or other water in upon (low-lying land), for the purpose of fertilization, by a deposit of warp, or slimy substance.
  • (ropemaking) To run off the reel into hauls to be tarred, as yarns.
  • To travel across a medium without passing through it normally, as by using a teleporter or time warp.
  • Anagrams

    *

    warns

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (warn)

  • warn

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) warnian, from (etyl) . Cognate with German warnen, Dutch waarnen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make (someone) aware of impending danger etc.
  • We waved a flag to warn the oncoming traffic.
  • To caution (someone) against unwise or unacceptable behaviour.
  • He was warned against crossing the railway tracks at night.
    Don't let me catch you running in the corridor again, I warn you.
  • To notify (someone) of something untoward.
  • I phoned to warn him of the rail strike.
  • To give warning.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, tr. Bible , Galatians II, 9-10:
  • then Iames Cephas and Iohn [...] agreed with vs that we shuld preache amonge the Hethen and they amonge the Iewes: warnynge only that we shulde remember the poore.
  • * 1973 , Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow , Penguin 1995, p. 177:
  • She is his deepest innocence in spaces of bough and hay before wishes were given a different name to warn that they might not come true [...].
  • * 1988 , Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses , Picador 2000, p. 496:
  • She warned that he was seriously thinking of withdrawing his offer to part the waters, ‘so that all you'll get at the Arabian Sea is a saltwater bath [...]’.
  • * 1991 , Clive James, ‘Making Programmes the World Wants’, The Dreaming Swimmer , Jonathan Cape 1992:
  • Every country has its resident experts who warn that imported television will destroy the national consciousness and replace it with Dallas'', ''The Waltons'', ''Star Trek'' and ''Twin Peaks .
    Usage notes
    * The intransitive sense is considered colloquial by some, and is explicitly proscribed by, for example, the Daily Telegraph style guide (which prefers give warning).
    Derived terms
    * warner * warning * warn off

    Etymology 2

    From a combination of (etyl) wiernan (from (etyl) ; compare Swedish varna).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To refuse, deny (someone something).
  • *:
  • *:And yf thou warne' her loue she shalle goo dye anone yf thou haue no pyte on her / that sygnefyeth the grete byrd / the whiche shalle make the to ' warne her