Winnest vs Wannest - What's the difference?

winnest | wannest |


As a verb winnest

is (archaic) (win).

As an adjective wannest is

(wan).

winnest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (win)

  • win

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Pleasure; joy; delight.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . Cognate with (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m).

    Verb

  • To conquer, defeat.
  • *1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book IV:
  • *:For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one kny?t at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght
  • *1998 , Rhapsody, Emerald Sword
  • *:For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord, I will search for the Emerald Sword.
  • (label) To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc.).
  • (label) To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.
  • :
  • (label) To obtain (someone) by wooing.
  • *Sir (Philip Sidney) (1554-1586)
  • *:Thy virtue won me; with virtue preserve me.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:She is a woman; therefore to be won .
  • (label) To achieve victory.
  • :
  • (label) To obtain (something desired).
  • :
  • (label) To cause a victory for someone.
  • :
  • :
  • To come to by toil or effort; to reach; to overtake.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Even in the porch he him did win .
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:And when the stony path began, / By which the naked peak they won , / Up flew the snowy ptarmigan.
  • To extract (ore, coal, etc.).
  • :(Raymond)
  • Derived terms
    * play to win * win friends * win up

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • gain; profit; income
  • wealth; owndom; goods
  • an individual victory (opposite of a loss)
  • Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 29 , author=Jon Smith , title=Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Giovani dos Santos smashed home a third five minutes later to wrap up the win .}}
  • (slang) a feat, an (extraordinary) achievement (opposite of a fail)
  • Derived terms

    * winning * winnings * winner * for the win * you win * win back * win through * win round * win out * win over * win-win English irregular verbs English three-letter words 1000 English basic words ----

    wannest

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (wan)

  • wan

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (wanner)
  • Pale, sickly-looking.
  • * Spenser
  • Sad to view, his visage pale and wan .
  • * Longfellow
  • the wan moon overhead
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1921 , year_published=2012 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burrows , title=The Efficiency Expert , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=She looked wan and worried, ... }}
  • Dim, faint.
  • * {{quote-book, passage=’twas so far away, that evil day when I prayed to the Prince of Gloom / For the savage strength and the sullen length of life to work his doom. / Nor sign nor word had I seen or heard, and it happed so long ago; / My youth was gone and my memory wan , and I willed it even so.
  • , title=(Ballads of a Cheechako) , chapter=(The Ballad of One-Eyed Mike) , author=Robert W. Service , year=1909}}
  • Bland, uninterested.
  • A wan expression

    Noun

    (-)
  • The quality of being wan; wanness.
  • * Tennyson
  • Tinged with wan from lack of sleep.

    Etymology 2

    Inflected forms.

    Verb

    (head)
  • (obsolete) (win)
  • Anagrams

    * ----