Canna vs Wanna - What's the difference?

canna | wanna |


As a proper noun canna

is .

As a contraction wanna is

or wanna can be .

canna

English

Etymology 1

(wikipedia canna) From (etyl) . (Canna)

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any member of the genus Canna of tropical plants with large leaves and often showy flowers.
  • * 2000 , (JG Ballard), Super-Cannes , Fourth Estate 2011, p. 7:
  • A palisade of Canary palms formed an honour guard along the verges, while beds of golden cannas flamed from the central reservation.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2007, date=January 18, author=Anne Raver, title=Is It Spring? Winter? What’s a Flower to Think?, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=Still, some of Mr. Cooper’s tender salvias are wintering over, and he plans to leave a few clumps of cannas in the ground next fall. }}

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (en-cont)
  • (Scotland, Jamaica) Contraction of can not; cannot.
  • * 1966 -- Star Trek: )
  • Scotty: I canna' change the laws of physics.

    Etymology 3

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A measure of length in Italy, varying from six to seven feet.
  • ----

    wanna

    English

    Etymology 1

    Written form of a of "want a", used informally in most English dialects

    Contraction

    (en-cont)
  • I wanna puppy!

    Etymology 2

    Written form of a of “want to”, used informally in most English dialects

    Contraction

    (en-cont)
  • I wanna go home!
    Derived terms
    * wanna contraction
    Usage notes
    Much more common in first and second person singular (“I wanna”, “you wanna”) than in third person singular or (first or third person) plural affirmative (“he wanna”, “she wanna”, “we wanna”, “they wanna”), and subjectively judged as flatly incorrect for third person, and marginal in plural.He Wanna Be Adored]”, [http://crookedtimber.org/ Crooked Timber, Brian Weatherson, January 30, 2004 However, all forms find some use, particularly in song lyrics. Rejection of third person singular affirmative *“he wanna” and *“she wanna” can be explained by “want to” reducing to wanna , but “wants to” not doing so, instead being pronounced approximately as “wants ta”. This objection does not arise in the negative (“he doesn’t wanna”, “she doesn’t wanna”), due to the absence of -s in the negative: “he does not want to”, “she does not want to”, and these forms are both common and unobjectionable. First and third person plural affirmative is also quite uncommon and somewhat objectionable, with the negative forms being very common, without an apparent explanation.

    References

    See also

    * gonna * gotta ----