Budge vs Wander - What's the difference?

budge | wander | Related terms |

Budge is a related term of wander.


As verbs the difference between budge and wander

is that budge is to move while wander is (lb) to move without purpose or specified destination; often in search of livelihood.

As nouns the difference between budge and wander

is that budge is a kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits while wander is the act or instance of wandering.

As an adjective budge

is (obsolete) brisk; stirring; jocund or budge can be (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

budge

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bouger.

Alternative forms

* budg (obsolete)

Verb

(budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *

    wander

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move without purpose or specified destination; often in search of livelihood.
  • :
  • *(Bible), (w) xi.37:
  • *:They wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins.
  • *
  • *:“A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron;. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
  • *
  • *:There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy.Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
  • (lb) To stray; stray from one's course; err.
  • :
  • *(Bible), (Psalms) cxix.10:
  • *:O, let me not wander from thy commandments.
  • (lb) To commit adultery.
  • (lb) To go somewhere indirectly or at varying speeds; to move in a curved path.
  • (lb) Of the mind, to lose focus or clarity of argument or attention.
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move without purpose) err, roam * (commit adultery) cheat * (go somewhere indirectly) * (lose focus) drift

    Derived terms

    * wander off * wanderer * wanderlust

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act or instance of wandering.
  • To go for a wander

    Anagrams

    * * * ----