Wriggle vs Wamble - What's the difference?

wriggle | wamble |


As verbs the difference between wriggle and wamble

is that wriggle is to twist one's body to and fro with short, writhing motions; to squirm while wamble is (dialect) to feel nauseous, to churn (of stomach) .

As nouns the difference between wriggle and wamble

is that wriggle is a wriggling movement while wamble is (obsolete) nausea; seething; bubbling; rolling boil.

wriggle

English

Verb

(wriggl)
  • To twist one's body to and fro with short, writhing motions; to squirm.
  • Teachers often lose their patience when children wriggle in their seats.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Both he and successors would often wriggle in their seats, as long as the cushion lasted.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1972 , author=Carlos CastaƱeda , title=The teachings of Don Juan: a Yaqui way of knowledge , page=78 citation , passage=I tried to ease my grip, but my hands were sweating so profusely that the lizards began to wriggle out of them.}}
  • To cause to or make something wriggle.
  • He was sitting on the lawn, wriggling his toes in the grass.

    Derived terms

    * wriggler * wriggly

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A wriggling movement.
  • Anagrams

    *

    wamble

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Nausea; seething; bubbling; rolling boil.
  • (dialect) An unsteady walk; a staggering or wobbling.
  • * 1887 ,
  • Fancy her white hands getting redder every day, and her tongue losing its pretty up-country curl in talking, and her bounding walk becoming the regular Hintock shail and wamble !
  • A stomach rumble.
  • Verb

  • (dialect) To feel nauseous, to churn (of stomach) .
  • (dialect) To twist and turn; to wriggle; to roll over.
  • (dialect) To wobble, to totter, to waver; to walk with an unsteady gait.
  • * 1887 ,
  • She may shail, but she'll never wamble .