Walker vs Walk - What's the difference?

walker | walk |

Walker is a derived term of walk.


As nouns the difference between walker and walk

is that walker is : a person who walks or a thing which walks, especially a pedestrian or a participant in a walking race while walk is a trip made by walking.

As a verb walk is

to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

walker

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • : a person who walks or a thing which walks, especially a pedestrian or a participant in a walking race.
  • * 1816 , (Jane Austen), , Volume 1 Chapter 8
  • "I would ask for the pleasure of your company, Mr. Knightley, but I am a very slow walker , and my pace would be tedious to you; and, besides, you have another long walk before you, to Donwell Abbey."
  • * 2005 , Carlo De Vito, 10 Secrets My Dog Taught Me: Life Lessons from a Man's Best Friend (page 88)
  • We hired a walker for the dogs during the day.
  • A walking frame.
  • (often, in the plural) A shoe designed for comfortable walking.
  • A person who walks (or waulks) cloth, that is, who fulls it.
  • A male escort who accompanies a woman to an event.
  • *
  • * 1981 , Spare rib: Volumes 108-119
  • Women at the top — Lady Di and Nancy Reagan in particular — apparently have 'walkers' — men to escort them on public and private occasions providing a respectable cover, while the male who is their sexual partner is off on more pressing business.
  • * 1984 , Clemens David Heymann, Poor little rich girl: the life and legend of Barbara Hutton
  • In the vernacular of the trade, he was what is commonly known as "a walker " — an entertaining male escort who is usually sexually unthreatening
  • * 2007 , (The Walker) (film about a male escort)
  • Synonyms

    * (walking frame) walking frame, Zimmer frame

    Derived terms

    * baby walker * highwire walker * * * tightrope walker

    See also

    * ----

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk