Walkover vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

walkover | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between walkover and walkabout

is that walkover is an easy victory; a walkaway while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

walkover

English

Noun

(wikipedia walkover)
  • An easy victory; a walkaway.
  • * 2013 , Daniel Taylor, Steven Gerrard goal against Poland ensures England will go to World Cup'' (in ''The Guardian , 15 October 2013)[http://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/oct/15/england-poland-world-cup-qualifier]
  • Along the way, there was another backdrop to this match, in the form of the goal updates from Serravalle informing everyone that Ukraine were on their way to the obligatory walkover against San Marino.
  • (tennis) A bye or victory awarded to a competitor when a scheduled opponent fails to play a game.
  • A horse race with only one entrant.
  • Someone easy to defeat.
  • (gymnastics) A backbend combined with a handstand.
  • A type of railroad passenger car seat, having reversible seat backs that can be moved across the seat to face either direction of travel
  • The train's walkover seats are turned by the crew.
    It took about 10 minutes to flip the walkovers in each car.

    Synonyms

    * (a walkaway) * (bye or victory due to default of opponent)

    walkabout

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australian aboriginal) A nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes
  • A walking trip
  • (British) A public stroll by some celebrity to meet a group of people informally
  • An absence, usually from a regular place with a possibility of a return.
  • (Australian)Colloquially used to denote any missing or stolen object ie. "The paper shredder seems to have gone walkabout."
  • (public stroll) * Dutch: , (trans-bottom) Australian Aboriginal English