Walk vs Tramp - What's the difference?

walk | tramp |


As verbs the difference between walk and tramp

is that walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run while tramp is to walk with heavy footsteps.

As nouns the difference between walk and tramp

is that walk is a trip made by walking while tramp is (pejorative) a homeless person, a vagabond.

walk

English

(walk)

Verb

(en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk

    tramp

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (pejorative) A homeless person, a vagabond.
  • *
  • She was frankly disappointed. For some reason she had thought to discover a burglar of one or another accepted type—either a dashing cracksman in full-blown evening dress, lithe, polished, pantherish, or a common yegg, a red-eyed, unshaven burly brute in the rags and tatters of a tramp .
  • (pejorative) A disreputable, promiscuous woman; a slut.
  • "I can't believe you'd let yourself be seen with that tramp ."
    "Claudia is such a tramp ; making out with all those men when she has a boyfriend."
  • Any ship which does not have a fixed schedule or published ports of call.
  • * 1888 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), :
  • I was so happy on board that ship, I could not have believed it possible. We had the beastliest weather, and many discomforts; but the mere fact of its being a tramp -ship gave us many comforts; we could cut about with the men and officers, stay in the wheel-house, discuss all manner of things, and really be a little at sea.
  • * 1919 , Charles Fort, :
  • Then I think I conceive of other worlds and vast structures that pass us by, within a few miles, without the slightest desire to communicate, quite as tramp vessels pass many islands without particularizing one from another.
  • * 1924 , George Sutherland, :
  • Some of these are regular ocean liners; others are casual tramp ships.
  • * 1960 , (Lobsang Rampa), :
  • “Hrrumph,” said the Mate. “Get into uniform right away, we must have discipline here.” With that he stalked off as if he were First Mate on one of the Queens instead of just on a dirty, rusty old tramp ship.
  • (Australia, New Zealand) A long walk, possibly of more than one day, in a scenic or wilderness area.
  • * 1968 , John W. Allen, It Happened in Southern Illinois , page 75:
  • The starting place for the tramp is reached over a gravel road that begins on Route 3 about a mile south of Gorham spur.
  • * 2005 , Paul Smitz, Australia & New Zealand on a Shoestring , Lonely Planet, page 734:
  • Speaking of knockout panoramas, if you?re fit then consider doing the taxing, winding, 8km tramp' up ' Mt Roy (1578m; five to six hours return), start 6km from Wanaka on Mt Aspiring Rd.
  • * 2006 , Marc Llewellyn, Lee Mylne, Frommer?s Australia from $60 a Day , page 186:
  • The 1½-hour tramp passes through banksia, gum, and wattle forests, with spectacular views of peaks and valleys.
  • , especially a very small one.
  • Synonyms

    * (homeless person) bum, hobo, vagabond ** See also * (disreputable woman) See also * (type of ship) see * (long walk) bushwalk, hike, ramble, trek

    Derived terms

    * tramp ant * tramp stamp

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To walk with heavy footsteps.
  • To walk for a long time (usually through difficult terrain).
  • We tramped through the woods for hours before we found the main path again.
  • To hitchhike
  • To tread upon forcibly and repeatedly; to trample.
  • To travel or wander through.
  • to tramp the country
  • (Scotland) To cleanse, as clothes, by treading upon them in water.
  • (Jamieson)

    Derived terms

    * trample * tromp

    References

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