Sweep vs Walk - What's the difference?

sweep | walk |


As verbs the difference between sweep and walk

is that sweep is to clean (a surface) by means of a motion of a broom or brush while walk is (lb) to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare .

As nouns the difference between sweep and walk

is that sweep is the person who steers a dragon boat while walk is a trip made by walking.

sweep

English

Verb

  • To clean (a surface) by means of a motion of a broom or brush.
  • to sweep a floor, the street, or a chimney
  • * (Bible), (w) xiv. 23
  • I will sweep it with the besom of destruction.
  • To move through an (horizontal) arc or similar long stroke.
  • * 2005 , (Lesley Brown) (translator), Sophist by (Plato), :
  • [H]as the course of the argument so accustomed you to agreeing that you were swept by it into a ready assent?
  • To search (a place) methodically.
  • (figuratively) To travel quickly.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=February 1, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Arsenal 2-1 Everton , passage=Everton took that disputed lead in a moment that caused anger to sweep around the Emirates. }}
  • (cricket) To play a sweep shot.
  • (curling) To brush the ice in front of a moving stone, causing it to travel farther and to curl less.
  • (ergative) To move something in a particular motion, as a broom.
  • (sports) To win (a series) without drawing or losing any of the games in that series.
  • (sports) To defeat (a team) in a series without drawing or losing any of the games in that series.
  • To remove something abruptly and thoroughly.
  • The wind sweeps the snow from the hills.
    The flooded river swept away the wooden dam.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author= Ed Pilkington
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=6, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= ‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told , passage=In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.}}
  • To brush against or over; to rub lightly along.
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Their long descending train, / With rubies edged and sapphires, swept the plain.
  • *
  • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  • To carry with a long, swinging, or dragging motion; hence, to carry in a stately or proud fashion.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • And like a peacock sweep along his tail.
  • To strike with a long stroke.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Wake into voice each silent string, / And sweep the sounding lyre.
  • (nautical) To draw or drag something over.
  • to sweep the bottom of a river with a net
  • To pass over, or traverse, with the eye or with an instrument of observation.
  • to sweep the heavens with a telescope

    Derived terms

    * sweeper * sweep across * sweep someone off their feet * sweep something under the rug * sweep up * sweepy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The person who steers a dragon boat.
  • A person who stands at the stern of a surf boat, steering with a steering oar and commanding the crew.
  • A chimney sweep.
  • A search (typically for bugs [electronic listening devices]).
  • (cricket) A batsman's shot, played from a kneeling position with a swinging horizontal bat.
  • A lottery, usually on the results of a sporting event, where players win if their randomly chosen team wins.
  • Jim will win fifty dollars in the office sweep if Japan wins the World Cup.
  • A flow of water parallel to shore caused by wave action at an ocean beach or at a point or headland.
  • A single action of sweeping.
  • Violent and general destruction.
  • the sweep of an epidemic disease
  • (metalworking) A movable templet for making moulds, in loam moulding.
  • (card games) In the game casino, the act of capturing all face-up cards from the table.
  • The compass of any turning body or of any motion.
  • the sweep''' of a door; the '''sweep of the eye
  • Direction or departure of a curve, a road, an arch, etc. away from a rectilinear line.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • the road which makes a small sweep
  • A large oar used in small vessels, partly to propel them and partly to steer them.
  • (refining, obsolete) The almond furnace.
  • A long pole, or piece of timber, moved on a horizontal fulcrum fixed to a tall post and used to raise and lower a bucket in a well for drawing water.
  • (in the plural) The sweepings of workshops where precious metals are worked, containing filings, etc.
  • Derived terms

    * chimney sweep * clean sweep * sweepstake

    References

    *

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk