Haled vs Waled - What's the difference?

haled | waled |


As verbs the difference between haled and waled

is that haled is (hale) while waled is (wale).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

haled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (hale)
  • Anagrams

    *

    hale

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (archaic) Health, welfare.
  • * Spenser
  • All heedless of his dearest hale .

    Etymology 2

    Representing a Northern dialectal form of (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Last year we thought him strong and hale .
  • * 1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
    "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
    Antonyms
    * unhale
    Usage notes
    * Now rather uncommon, except in the stock phrase "hale and hearty".

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) halen, from (etyl) haler, from (etyl) ‘upright beam on a loom’). Doublet of (l).

    Verb

    (hal)
  • To drag, pull, especially forcibly.
  • * , II.6:
  • For I had beene vilely hurried and haled by those poore men, which had taken the paines to carry me upon their armes a long and wearysome way, and to say truth, they had all beene wearied twice or thrice over, and were faine to shift severall times.
  • * 1820 , (Percy Bysshe Shelley), , :
  • The wingless, crawling hours, one among whom / As some dark Priest hales the reluctant victim / Shall drag thee, cruel King, to kiss the blood.
  • *
  • He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance..
  • * 1992 , (Hilary Mantel), (A Place of Greater Safety) , Harper Perennial, 2007, page 262:
  • They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    waled

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (wale)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    wale

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) wale, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A ridge or low barrier.
  • A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course)
  • The texture of a piece of fabric.
  • (nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
  • A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
  • A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.
  • (Knight)
  • A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
  • A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.
  • (Holland)

    Verb

    (wal)
  • To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale.
  • * 1832: Owen Felltham, Resolves, Divine, Moral, Political
  • Would suffer his lazy rider to bestride his patie: back, with his hands and whip to wale his flesh, and with his heels to dig into his hungry bowels?
  • * 2002: Hal Rothman, Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century
  • When faced with an adulthood that offered few options, grinding poverty and marriage to a man who drank too much and came home to wale on his own family or...no beatings.
  • To give a surface a texture of wales.
  • See also

    * whale * weal * wheal

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . More at will.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.
  • Verb

  • to choose, select.
  • Anagrams

    * ---- ==Fulniô==

    Noun

    (head)
  • References

    * 2009' (originally '''1968 ), Douglas Meland, Doris Meland, ''Fulniô (Yahthe) Syntax Structure: Preliminary Version , Associação Internacional de Linguística - SIL Brasil, page 19. ----