Leverage vs Waiver - What's the difference?

leverage | waiver |


As nouns the difference between leverage and waiver

is that leverage is a force compounded by means of a lever rotating around a pivot; see torque while waiver is the act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege.

As verbs the difference between leverage and waiver

is that leverage is (transitive|chiefly|us|slang|business) to use; to exploit; to take full advantage (of something) while waiver is .

leverage

English

Noun

(en-noun)
  • A force compounded by means of a lever rotating around a pivot; see torque.
  • A crowbar uses leverage to pry nails out of wood.
  • By extension, any influence which is compounded or used to gain an advantage.
  • Try using competitors’ prices for leverage in the negotiation.
  • (finance) The use of borrowed funds with a contractually determined return to increase the ability of a business to invest and earn an expected higher return, but usually at high risk.
  • Leverage is great until something goes wrong with your investments and you still have to pay your debts.
  • *
  • (business) The ability to earn very high returns when operating at high capacity utilization of a facility.
  • Their variable-cost-reducing investments have dramatically increased their leverage .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=April 15 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Norwich 2 - 1 Nott'm Forest , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The former Forest man, who passed a late fitness test, appeared to use Guy Moussi for leverage before nodding in David Fox's free-kick at the far post - his 22nd goal of the season.}}

    Synonyms

    * (force compounded by a lever) mechanical advantage * (use of borrowed fund) financial leverage * (ability to earn high returns from high capacity utilization) operating leverage

    Verb

    (leverag)
  • (transitive, chiefly, US, slang, business) To use; to exploit; to take full advantage (of something).
  • Derived terms

    * leveraged buyout

    Synonyms

    * (take full advantage of) exploit, use

    waiver

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege.
  • (legal) A legal document releasing some requirement, such as waiving a right (giving it up) or a waiver of liability (agreeing to hold someone blameless). Also used for such a form even before it is filled out and signed.
  • I had to sign a waiver when I went skydiving, agreeing not to sue even if something went wrong.
  • Something that releases a person from a requirement.
  • I needed a waiver from the department head to take the course because I didn't technically have the prerequisite courses.
    I needed a waiver from the zoning board for the house because the lot was so small, but they let me build because it was next to the park.

    Derived terms

    * waivered

    See also

    * ("waiver" on Wikipedia)

    Verb

    (head)
  • See waive.
  • Usage notes

    * Sometimes used in puns involving wavering]] about [[waiver
  • noun, waivers, the noun, especially in newspaper headlines for sports stories.
  • Anagrams

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