Waled vs Waged - What's the difference?

waled | waged |


As verbs the difference between waled and waged

is that waled is (wale) while waged is (wage).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

waled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (wale)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    wale

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) wale, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A ridge or low barrier.
  • A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course)
  • The texture of a piece of fabric.
  • (nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
  • A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
  • A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.
  • (Knight)
  • A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
  • A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.
  • (Holland)

    Verb

    (wal)
  • To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale.
  • * 1832: Owen Felltham, Resolves, Divine, Moral, Political
  • Would suffer his lazy rider to bestride his patie: back, with his hands and whip to wale his flesh, and with his heels to dig into his hungry bowels?
  • * 2002: Hal Rothman, Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century
  • When faced with an adulthood that offered few options, grinding poverty and marriage to a man who drank too much and came home to wale on his own family or...no beatings.
  • To give a surface a texture of wales.
  • See also

    * whale * weal * wheal

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . More at will.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.
  • Verb

  • to choose, select.
  • Anagrams

    * ---- ==Fulniô==

    Noun

    (head)
  • References

    * 2009' (originally '''1968 ), Douglas Meland, Doris Meland, ''Fulniô (Yahthe) Syntax Structure: Preliminary Version , Associação Internacional de Linguística - SIL Brasil, page 19. ----

    waged

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (wage)

  • wage

    English

    (wikipedia wage)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from . Akin to (etyl) '''' "to pledge", (etyl) ''wadi''. Compare also the doublet ''gage . More at wed. Possible contributory etylomolgy from from the Old English wæge (meaning "weight," as wages at times have been goods or coin measured on a scale).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An amount of money paid to a worker for a specified quantity of work, usually expressed on an hourly basis.
  • Synonyms
    * earnings, pay, salary
    Derived terms
    * hourly wage * lost wages * wage moderation * wage scale

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) intermediate *''wadiare'' from *''wadium .

    Verb

    (wag)
  • To wager, bet.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:My life I never held but as a pawn / To wage against thy enemies.
  • :(Hakluyt)
  • To expose oneself to, as a risk; to incur, as a danger; to venture; to hazard.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:too weak to wage an instant trial with the king
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:to wake and wage a danger profitless
  • To employ for wages; to hire.
  • *:
  • *:Thenne said Arthur I wille goo with yow / Nay said the kynges ye shalle not at this tyme / for ye haue moche to doo yet in these landes / therfore we wille departe / and with the grete goodes that we haue goten in these landes by youre yeftes we shalle wage good knyghtes & withstande the kynge Claudas malyce
  • *(Raphael Holinshed) (1529-1580)
  • *:abundance of treasure which he had in store, wherewith he might wage soldiers
  • (label) To conduct or carry out (a war or other contest).
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:[He pondered] which of all his sons was fit / To reign and wage immortal war with wit.
  • *(Isaac Taylor) (1787–1865)
  • *:The two are waging war, and the one triumphs by the destruction of the other.
  • (label) To adventure, or lay out, for hire or reward; to hire out.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Thoumust wage thy works for wealth.
  • To give security for the performance of.
  • :(Burrill)
  • Usage notes
    * "Wage" collocates strongly with "war", leading to expressions such as To wage peace'', or ''To wage football implying the inclusion of a large element of conflict in the action.
    Derived terms
    * (agent noun)