Wing vs Waft - What's the difference?

wing | waft | Related terms |

Wing is a related term of waft.


In nautical|lang=en terms the difference between wing and waft

is that wing is (nautical) that part of the hold or orlop of a vessel which is nearest the sides in a fleet, one of the extremities when the ships are drawn up in line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle while waft is (nautical) a flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.

As nouns the difference between wing and waft

is that wing is an appendage of an animal's (bird, bat, insect) body that enables it to fly while waft is a light breeze.

As verbs the difference between wing and waft

is that wing is (lb) to injure slightly (as with a gunshot), especially in the arm while waft is (ergative) to (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.

wing

English

(wikipedia)

Alternative forms

* whing (obsolete) * weng (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • An appendage of an animal's (bird, bat, insect) body that enables it to fly.
  • (slang) Human arm.
  • Part of an airplane that produces the lift for rising into the air.
  • One of the large pectoral fins of a flying fish.
  • One of the broad, thin, anterior lobes of the foot of a pteropod, used as an organ in swimming.
  • (botany) Any membranaceous expansion, such as that along the sides of certain stems, or of a fruit of the kind called samara.
  • (botany) Either of the two side petals of a papilionaceous flower.
  • A side shoot of a tree or plant; a branch growing up by the side of another.
  • Passage by flying; flight.
  • to take wing
  • * Shakespeare
  • Light thickens; and the crow / Makes wing to the rooky wood.
  • Motive or instrument of flight; means of flight or of rapid motion.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Fiery expedition be my wing .
  • A part of something that is lesser in size than the main body, such as an extension from the main building.
  • Anything that agitates the air as a wing does, or is put in winglike motion by the action of the air, such as a fan or vane for winnowing grain, the vane or sail of a windmill, etc.
  • An ornament worn on the shoulder; a small epaulet or shoulder knot.
  • A fraction of a political movement. Usually implies a position apart from the mainstream center position.
  • An organizational grouping in a military aviation service:
  • # (British) A unit of command consisting of two or more squadrons and itself being a sub-unit of a group or station.
  • # (US) A larger formation of two or more groups, which in turn control two or more squadrons.
  • (British) A panel of a car which encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels.
  • (nautical) A platform on either side of the bridge of a vessel, normally found in pairs.
  • (nautical) That part of the hold or orlop of a vessel which is nearest the sides. In a fleet, one of the extremities when the ships are drawn up in line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.
  • (Totten)
  • (sports) A position in several field games on either side of the field.
  • (sports) A player occupying such a position, also called a winger
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 2 , author= , title=Wales 2-1 Montenegro , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The Tottenham wing was causing havoc down the right and when he broke past the bemused Sasa Balic once again, Bellamy was millimetres from connecting with his cross as the Liverpool striker hurled himself at the ball.}}
  • (botany) A flattened extension of a tridimensional plant organ.
  • (typography, informal, rare) =
  • * 1985 , David Grambs, Literary Companion Dictionary , page 378
  • ? wing , wedge, h?cek, inverted circumflex (Karel ?apek )
  • One of the sides of the stage in a theatre.
  • Synonyms

    * (panel of a car) fender (US), guard (Australia) * (sports position) forward

    Derived terms

    * left wing * on the wing * redwing * right wing * take under one's wing * wingman * wing it * winged * winger

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To injure slightly (as with a gunshot), especially in the arm.
  • (lb) To fly.
  • *
  • *:Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  • To add a wing (extra part) to.
  • (lb) To act or speak extemporaneously; to improvise; to wing it.
  • (lb) To throw.
  • waft

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ergative) To (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.
  • * A breeze came in through the open window and wafted her sensuous perfume into my eager nostrils.
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Through the open window of the church the fragrant incense was wafted and with it the fragrant names of her who was conceived without stain of original sin…
  • * 1914 , Hugh G. Evelyn-White’s translation of Hymn to Aphrodite from the .[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0138%3Ahymn%3D6]
  • There the moist breath of the western wind wafted her over the waves of the loud-moaning sea in soft foam, and there the gold-filleted Hours welcomed her joyously.
  • To be moved, or to pass, on a buoyant medium; to float.
  • * Dryden
  • And now the shouts waft near the citadel.
  • To give notice to by waving something; to wave the hand to; to beckon.
  • * Shakespeare
  • But soft: who wafts us yonder?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A light breeze.
  • Something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Meanwhile, the wafts from his old home pleaded, whispered, conjured, and finally claimed him imperiously.
  • * 2010 September, "The SLM'' Calendar", , ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 170:
  • Patrol Magazine says of this Oxford, Miss., band: "Guitars are responsible for every noise in Colour Revolt's mix—not a single note of piano, waft of synthesizer, or evidence of electronic tampering are to be found."
  • (nautical) A flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.