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Ladest vs Wadest - What's the difference?

ladest | wadest |

In archaic terms the difference between ladest and wadest

is that ladest is archaic second-person singular of lade while wadest is archaic second-person singular of wade.

ladest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (lade)
  • ----

    lade

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), akin to (etyl) ).

    Verb

  • To fill or load (related to cargo or a shipment).
  • * Bible, Genesis xlii. 26
  • And they laded their asses with the corn.
  • To weigh down, oppress, or burden.
  • To use a ladle or dipper to remove something (generally water).
  • to lade water out of a tub, or into a cistern
  • * Shakespeare
  • And chides the sea that sunders him from thence, / Saying, he'll lade it dry to have his way.
  • To transfer (molten glass) from the pot to the forming table, in making plate glass.
  • (nautical) To admit water by leakage.
  • Etymology 2

    English dialect, a ditch or drain. Compare (lode), (lead) to conduct.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) The mouth of a river.
  • (Bishop Gibson)
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) A passage for water; a ditch or drain.
  • (Scottish) Water pumped into and out of mills, especially woolen mills.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * * * * * English irregular verbs ----

    wadest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (wade)

  • wade

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) wadan'', from (etyl) "to go". Cognates include Latin ''vadere "go, walk; rush" (whence English invade, evade).

    Verb

    (wad)
  • to walk through water or something that impedes progress.
  • * Milton
  • So eagerly the fiend / With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, / And swims, or sinks, or wades , or creeps, or flies.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter VIII
  • After breakfast the men set out to hunt, while the women went to a large pool of warm water covered with a green scum and filled with billions of tadpoles. They waded in to where the water was about a foot deep and lay down in the mud. They remained there from one to two hours and then returned to the cliff.
  • to progress with difficulty
  • to wade through a dull book
  • * Dryden
  • And wades through fumes, and gropes his way.
  • * Davenant
  • The king's admirable conduct has waded through all these difficulties.
  • to walk through (water or similar impediment); to pass through by wading
  • wading swamps and rivers
  • To enter recklessly.
  • to wade into a fight or a debate

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • an act of wading
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (-)
  • (Mortimer)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * * ----