Bat vs Waddy - What's the difference?

bat | waddy | Related terms |

Bat is a related term of waddy.


As an acronym bat

is best available technology; a principle applying to regulations]] on limiting pollutant [[discharge|discharges.

As a noun waddy is

(colloquial) a cowboy or waddy can be (australia) a war club used by aboriginal australians; a nulla nulla.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bat

English

(wikipedia bat)

Etymology 1

Dialectal variant (akin to the dialectal (etyl) term (m)) of (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) (compare (etyl) (m), (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation.
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat' he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a '''bat''' he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a ' bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • *2012 , Suemedha Sood, (bbc.co.uk) Travelwise: Texas love bats] [sic
  • *:As well as being worth millions of dollars to the Texan agriculture industry, these mammals are worth millions of dollars to the state’s tourism industry. Texas is home to the world’s largest known bat' colony (in Comal County), and the world’s largest urban '''bat''' colony (in Austin). '''Bat''' watching is a common activity, with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offering more ' bat -viewing sites than anywhere else in the US.
  • (lb) An old woman.
  • A whore who prowls in the dusk/evening like a bat.
  • Synonyms
    * (flying mammal)
    Derived terms
    * Batman * batlike * batshit * battish * batty * blind as a bat * fruit bat * have bats in the belfry * leaf-nosed bat * (little brown bat) * (brown bat) * like a bat out of hell * microbat * moonbat * vampire bat * vesper bat
    See also
    * * * (bat) * (Chiroptera)

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.
  • A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.
  • (two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language , second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242
  • (mining) Shale or bituminous shale.
  • (Kirwan)
  • A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  • A part of a brick with one whole end.
  • Synonyms
    * (two-up) kip, stick, kylie, lannet
    Derived terms
    (derived terms) * baseball bat * batless * batman * bats * batsman * cricket bat

    Verb

    (batt)
  • to hit with a bat.
  • to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.
  • to strike or swipe as though with a bat
  • The cat batted at the toy.
    Derived terms
    * bat five hundred * bat in * bat out * bat up * (verb)
    Hyponyms
    * Myotis

    References

    Etymology 3

    Possibly a variant of bate.

    Verb

  • to flutter: bat one's eyelashes .
  • Usage notes
    Most commonly used in phrase bat an eye, and variants thereof.
    Derived terms
    * bat an eye, bat an eyelash, bat an eyelid

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) . "batman." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. 2009. Cognate to (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) packsaddle
  • Derived terms
    * batman

    References

    waddy

    English

    Etymology 1

    Origin unknown.

    Alternative forms

    * waddie

    Noun

    (waddies)
  • (colloquial) A cowboy.
  • * 1992 , , All the Pretty Horses ,
  • This is how it was with the old waddies , aint it?
  • * 1968 , , True Grit ,
  • If I ever meet one of you Texas waddies that says he never drank from a horse track I think I will shake his hand and give him a Daniel Webster cigar.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (waddies)
  • (Australia) A war club used by Aboriginal Australians; a nulla nulla.
  • * 1839 , William Mann, Six Years' Residence in the Australian Provinces , page 156,
  • After waiting for some time, and nothing being done, I began to think that the settlement tribes were afraid of the mountaineers, whose chosen warriors advanced in a line, striking their shields with their waddies', singing their war-cry, wa-ah ! wa-ah ! wa-ah ! aa-ho ! aa-ho ! aa-ho ! hi-hi-hi !—I should have told you that many of the Amity Paint tribe, which is more numerous than the other two settlement tribes, were deficient of spears and shields, having nothing but ' waddies and boomerangs.
  • * 1840 May—August, (editor), Van Diemen's Land'', ''The Colonial Magazine and Commercial-maritime Journal , Volume 2, page 76,
  • In the mean while women, children, and remote stock-keepers fell under the unerring spears or death-dealing waddies of an enemy, the first indication of whose appearance was consectaneous with the stroke that reft his victim of life.
  • * 2008 , Doreen Kartinyeri, Sue Anderson, Doreen Kartinyeri: My Ngarrindjeri Calling , page 20,
  • The kids would copy the men to make their own cricket stumps, but no-one was allowed to touch Grandfather's special wood for making waddies .