Abrupt vs Vulgar - What's the difference?

abrupt | vulgar |


As adjectives the difference between abrupt and vulgar

is that abrupt is (obsolete|rare) broken away (from restraint) while vulgar is vulgar.

As a verb abrupt

is (archaic) to tear off or asunder .

As a noun abrupt

is (poetic) something which is ; an abyss .

abrupt

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • (obsolete, rare) Broken away (from restraint).
  • Without notice to prepare the mind for the event; sudden; hasty; unceremonious.
  • The party came to an abrupt end when the parents of our host arrived.
  • * (rfdate) (William Shakespeare), Henry VI Part I, II-iii
  • The cause of your abrupt departure.
  • Curt in manner; brusque; rude; uncivil; impolite.
  • Having sudden transitions from one subject or state to another; unconnected; disjointed.
  • * (rfdate) (Ben Jonson)
  • The abrupt style, which hath many breaches.
  • (obsolete) Broken off.
  • Extremely steep or craggy as if broken up; precipitous.
  • * (rfdate) (Thomson)
  • Tumbling through ricks abrupt .
  • (botany) Suddenly terminating, as if cut off; truncate.
  • (Gray)

    Synonyms

    * (precipitous) broken, rough, rugged * (without time to prepare) brusque, sudden * (uncivil)blunt, brusque * (without transition) disconnected, unexpected

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) To tear off or asunder.
  • * (rfdate) Sir T. (Browne)
  • Till death abrupts them.
  • To interrupt suddenly.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (poetic) Something which is ; an abyss.
  • * (rfdate) (Milton)
  • Over the vast abrupt .

    References

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    vulgar

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Debased, uncouth, distasteful, obscene.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year= 1551 , year_published= 1888 , author= , by= , title= A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society. , url= http://books.google.com/books?id=JmpXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA217 , original= , chapter= , section= Part 1 , isbn= , edition= , publisher= Clarendon Press , location= Oxford , editor= , volume= 1 , page= 217 , passage= Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar , but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber. }}
  • * The construction worker made a vulgar suggestion to the girls walking down the street.
  • (classical sense) Having to do with ordinary, common people.
  • * Bishop Fell
  • It might be more useful to the English reader to write in our vulgar language.
  • * Bancroft
  • The mechanical process of multiplying books had brought the New Testament in the vulgar tongue within the reach of every class.
  • * 1860 , G. Syffarth, "A Remarkable Seal in Dr. Abbott's Museum at New York", Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis? , age 265
  • Further, the same sacred name in other monuments precedes the vulgar name of King Takellothis , the sixth of the XXII. Dyn., as we have seen.

    Synonyms

    * (obscene) inappropriate, obscene, debased, uncouth, offensive, ignoble, mean, profane * (ordinary) common, ordinary, popular

    Derived terms

    * (obscene) vulgarity * (ordinary) vulgar fraction, vulgate, Vulgate * vulgar fraction