Bower vs Villa - What's the difference?

bower | villa |


As proper nouns the difference between bower and villa

is that bower is while villa is (soccer) , a football club based in birmingham.

bower

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle.
  • * Gascoigne
  • Give me my lute in bed now as I lie, / And lock the doors of mine unlucky bower .
  • (literary) A dwelling; a picturesque country cottage, especially one that is used as a retreat.
  • (Shenstone)
  • A shady, leafy shelter or recess in a garden or woods.
  • * 1599 ,
  • say that thou overheard'st us,
    And bid her steal into the pleached bower ,
    Where honey-suckles, ripen'd by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter;
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=1 citation , passage=
  • (ornithology) A large structure made of grass and bright objects, used by the bower bird during courtship displays.
  • Synonyms
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To embower; to enclose.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lodge.
  • (Spenser)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) boueer, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A peasant; a farmer.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) Bauer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Either of the two highest trumps in euchre.
  • Derived terms
    * best bower * left bower * right bower

    Etymology 4

    From the bow of a ship

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow.
  • One who bows or bends.
  • A muscle that bends a limb, especially the arm.
  • * Spenser
  • His rawbone arms, whose mighty brawned bowers / Were wont to rive steel plates and helmets hew.

    Etymology 5

    From bough, compare brancher.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, falconry) A young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.
  • (Webster 1913)

    villa

    English

    (wikipedia villa)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A house, often larger and more expensive than average, in the countryside or on the coast, often used as a retreat.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=, title=“Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days, chapter=3/6/1 citation
  • , passage=This villa' was long and low and white, and severe after its manner?: for upon and about it were none of those playful ebullitions of taste, such as conical towers, domed roofs, embattlements, statues, coloured tiles and crenellations, such as are dear to architects of ' villas all the world over.}}
  • (UK) A family house, often semi-detached, in a middle class street.
  • (Ancient Rome) a country house, with farm buildings around a courtyard.
  • See also

    * dacha ----