Page vs View - What's the difference?

page | view |


As a proper noun page

is for someone who was a servant.

As a noun view is

(label) visual perception.

As a verb view is

to look at.

page

English

(wikipedia page)

Etymology 1

Via (etyl) from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • One of the many pieces of paper bound together within a book or similar document.
  • * (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) (1807-1882)
  • Such was the book from whose pages she sang.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= The Evolution of Eyeglasses , passage=The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone,
  • One side of a paper leaf on which one has written or printed.
  • A figurative record or writing; a collective memory.
  • (label) The type set up for printing a page.
  • (label) A web page.
  • (label) A block of contiguous memory of a fixed length.
  • Synonyms
    * (side of a leaf) side * account, record
    Derived terms
    (Terms derived from "page") * on the same page * page in, page out * page-turner *

    Verb

    (pag)
  • To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript.
  • To turn several pages of a publication.
  • The patient paged through magazines while he waited for the doctor.
  • To furnish with folios.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), possibly via (etyl) (m), from , in sense of "boy from the rural regions". Used in English from the 13th century onwards.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A serving boy – a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education.
  • (British) A youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households.
  • (US) A boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body.
  • (in libraries) The common name given to an employee whose main purpose is to replace materials that have either been checked out or otherwise moved, back to their shelves.
  • A boy child.
  • * 1380+ , (Geoffrey Chaucer), (The Canterbury Tales)
  • A doghter hadde they bitwixe]] hem two / Of twenty yeer, with-outen any mo, / Savinge a child that was of half-yeer age; / In [[cradle, cradel it lay and was a propre page .
  • A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman’s dress from the ground.
  • A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack.
  • Any one of several species of colorful South American moths of the genus Urania .
  • Synonyms
    * (serving boy) page boy * (boy child) boy

    Verb

    (pag)
  • To attend (someone) as a page.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To call or summon (someone).
  • To contact (someone) by means of a pager.
  • I’ll be out all day, so page me if you need me.
  • To call (somebody) using a public address system so as to find them.
  • An SUV parked me in. Could you please page its owner?

    Anagrams

    * (l) 1000 English basic words ----

    view

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) Visual perception.
  • # The act of seeing or looking at something.
  • #* (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Thenceforth I thought thee worth my nearer view .
  • #* (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • Objects near our view are thought greater than those of a larger size are more remote.
  • #*{{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=But Richmond
  • # The range of vision.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • The walls of Pluto's palace are in view .
  • # Something to look at, such as scenery.
  • #* (1777-1844)
  • 'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view .
  • # (label) Appearance; show; aspect.
  • #* (Edmund Waller) (1606-1687)
  • [Graces] which, by the splendor of her view / Dazzled, before we never knew.
  • A picture, drawn or painted; a sketch.
  • (label) Opinion, judgement, imagination.
  • # A mental image.
  • #* (William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • I have with exact view perused thee, Hector.
  • # A way of understanding something, an opinion, a theory.
  • #* (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • to give a right view of this mistaken part of liberty
  • # A point of view.
  • # An intention or prospect.
  • #* (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • No man sets himself about anything but upon some view or other which serves him for a reason.
  • A virtual or logical table composed of the result set of a query in relational databases.
  • The part of a computer program which is visible to the user and can be interacted with; a user interface.
  • A wake. (rfex)
  • Antonyms

    * (part of computer program) model, controller

    Derived terms

    * angle of view * bankruptcy view * bird's-eye view * by-view * clear view screen * counterview * exploded view * field of view * in full view * in view of * out of view * page view * pay-per-view * point of view * rear-view * viewable * view angle * view camera * viewfinder/view finder * viewgraph * viewless * viewpoint * viewy * worldview/world-view/world view * worm's-eye view/worm's eye view

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To look at.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-14, author=(Jonathan Freedland)
  • , volume=189, issue=1, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Obama's once hip brand is now tainted , passage=Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet. Perhaps we assume that our name, address and search preferences will be viewed by some unseen pair of corporate eyes, probably not human, and don't mind that much.}}
  • To show.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * preview * review * viewer * viewing

    See also

    * see * look * voyeur

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

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