Victory vs Triumph - What's the difference?

victory | triumph |


As nouns the difference between victory and triumph

is that victory is an instance of having won a competition or battle while triumph is a conclusive success following an effort, conflict, or confrontation of obstacles; victory; conquest.

As verbs the difference between victory and triumph

is that victory is (rare) to achieve a while triumph is to prevail over rivals, challenges, or difficulties.

victory

English

Noun

(victories)
  • An instance of having won a competition or battle.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=November 12 , author= , title=International friendly: England 1-0 Spain , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=England will not be catapulted among the favourites for Euro 2012 as a result of this win, but no victory against Spain is earned easily and it is right they take great heart from their efforts as they now prepare to play Sweden at Wembley on Tuesday.}}
  • A winged figure representing victory, common in Roman official iconography. See .
  • Antonyms

    * defeat * loss

    Derived terms

    * hollow victory * Pyrrhic victory * victory at sea

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (rare) To achieve a
  • triumph

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) triumphe , from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A conclusive success following an effort, conflict, or confrontation of obstacles; victory; conquest.
  • the triumph of knowledge
  • A magnificent and imposing ceremonial performed in honor of a victor.
  • (obsolete) Any triumphal procession; a pompous exhibition; a stately show or pageant.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Our daughter, / In honour of whose birth these triumphs are, / Sits here, like beauty's child.
  • A state of joy or exultation at success.
  • * Milton
  • Great triumph and rejoicing was in heaven.
  • * Dryden
  • Hercules from Spain / Arrived in triumph , from Geryon slain.
  • (obsolete) A trump card.
  • A card game, also called trump.
  • (historical, Ancient Rome) a ceremony held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the military achievement of an army commander.
  • A work of art, cuisine, etc. of very high quality.
  • Scorsese's latest film is a triumph .
    This wedding cake is a triumph .

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice over success; to exult in an advantage gained; to exhibit exultation.
  • * Bible, Psalms xciv. 3
  • How long shall the wicked triumph ?
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sorrow on thee and all the pack of you / That triumph thus upon my misery!
  • To prevail over rivals, challenges, or difficulties.
  • To succeed, win, or attain ascendancy.
  • * Macaulay
  • On this occasion, however, genius triumphed.
  • To be prosperous; to flourish.
  • * Trumbull
  • where commerce triumphed on the favouring gales
  • To play a trump in a card game.
  • (Ben Jonson)