Vibrant vs Vivid - What's the difference?

vibrant | vivid |


As adjectives the difference between vibrant and vivid

is that vibrant is pulsing with energy or activity while vivid is (of perception) clear, detailed or powerful.

As a noun vivid is

(new zealand) a felt-tipped permanent marker.

vibrant

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Pulsing with energy or activity
  • He has a vibrant personality.
  • Lively and vigorous
  • Vibrating, resonant or resounding
  • * {{quote-journal
  • , year=1770 , title=The Empire of Love. / A Philosophical Poem. , journal=Miscellanies, in Verse and Prose, English and Latin , page=111 , publisher=T. Bensley, for J. White , author=Anthony Champion , passage=Mock their pale vigils, void and vain, / Whether, more curious than humane, / Like Augurs old, they pore / On the still-vibrant fibre's frame;}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , title=The Singing of the Future , author=David Thomas Ffrangcon-Davies , publisher=J. Lane , year=1905 , page=258 , passage=A vibrant voice in the true sense is of course desirable}}
  • (of a colour) bright
  • vivid

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (New Zealand) A felt-tipped permanent marker.
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (of perception) Clear, detailed or powerful.
  • (of an image) Bright, intense or colourful.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=1 citation , passage=The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. To display them the walls had been tinted a vivid blue which had now faded, but the carpet, which had evidently been stored and recently relaid, retained its original turquoise.}}
  • Full of life, strikingly alive.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=32 citation , passage=The vivid , untrammeled life appealed to him, and for a time he had found delight in it; but he was wise and knew that once peace was established there would be no room in Cuba for the Sin Verguenza.}}

    Derived terms

    * vividness * vividly