Expatiate vs Verbose - What's the difference?

expatiate | verbose |


As a verb expatiate

is to range at large, or without restraint.

As an adjective verbose is

abounding in words, containing more words than necessary long winded, or windy.

expatiate

English

Verb

(expatiat)
  • To range at large, or without restraint.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Bids his free soul expatiate in the skies.
  • To write or speak at length; to be copious in argument or discussion, to descant.
  • *1851 ,
  • Now, as the business of standing mast-heads, ashore or afloat, is a very ancient and interesting one, let us in some measure expatiate here.
  • * Addison
  • He expatiated on the inconveniences of trade.
  • * 2007 , Clive James, Cultural Amnesia (Picador 2007, p. 847)
  • *:“It can't fly,” he expatiated . “It can move forward only by hopping.”
  • (obsolete) To expand; to spread; to extend; to diffuse; to broaden.
  • verbose

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Abounding in words, containing more words than necessary. Long winded, or windy.
  • (computing) Producing unusually detailed output for diagnostic purposes.
  • * 2001 , Richard Blum, Postfix (page 532)
  • You should use verbose logging sparingly. Turning on verbose logging for every process would result in log files so large they would become useless.

    Synonyms

    * wordy * long-winded * See also

    Antonyms

    * concise * terse

    Anagrams

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