Obsequious vs Venerate - What's the difference?

obsequious | venerate |


As an adjective obsequious

is (archaic) obedient, compliant with someone else's orders or wishes.

As a verb venerate is

to treat with great respect and deference.

obsequious

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (archaic) Obedient, compliant with someone else's orders or wishes.
  • Excessively eager and attentive to please or to obey all instructions; fawning, subservient, servile.
  • * 1927 , (Thornton Wilder), (The Bridge of San Luis Rey) , p. 20
  • Translation falls especially short of this conceit which carries the whole flamboyance of the Spanish language. It was intended as an obsequious flattery of the Condesa, and was untrue.
  • (obsolete) Of or pertaining to obsequies, funereal.
  • *
  • … the survivor bound
    In filial obligation for some term
    To do obsequious sorrow…
  • *
  • Whilst I awhile obsequiously lament
    Th’ untimely fall of virtuous Lancaster.

    Usage notes

    * In modern usage, not to be confused with obsequies as the “funereal” sense has become obsolete.

    Synonyms

    * (fawning or subservient) fawning, ingratiating, servile, slavish, sycophantic, truckling, people pleaser, kiss-ass

    venerate

    English

    Verb

    (venerat)
  • To treat with great respect and deference.
  • To revere or hold in awe.
  • Anagrams

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